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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 17:28 on 30 December 2011.
's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 4248

On Saturday, 31st December between 07:00 and 11:00 Vintage Radio and Television will be offline so that annual server maintenance can be carried out. The server will be turned off, stripped, cleaned and reassembled and then operating system patching and security updates will be applied.

There will also be some work carried out on the database before the site is returned to active service.

Update: Work is now complete.


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Brad.

A valve a day keeps the transistor away...


 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 08:40 on 1 January 2012.
's avatar
 Location: Tamworth, NSW.
 Member since 8 July 2011.
 Member #: 954
 Postcount: 10

Hi Brad, I was reminded of the old days when reading about the light sockets on radio power cords. In those days houses didn't have a lot of power points and most houses had a 3 pin supply with a pilot lamp connected to it to let the owner know the power was still on, ( in those days we had a lot of power blackouts and hence, you were warned no lamp-no power ) this was usually used to plug the fridge into.
When people purchased a mantle radio the perfect spot for it would be the top of a fridge so the pilot lamp would be removed and the radio pluged in.
Ha yes "The Good Old Days"


 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 12:34 on 1 January 2012.
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 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW.
 Member since 15 November 2005.
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 4248

I always thought it was the other way around - where the bayonet socket was put there to power the radio and in later years when the sockets fell out of use people put pilot lamps in to stop fingers getting inserted.

Quite a few radios I have bought have come with their original bayonet plug though for convenience, these are replaced with a three pin plug when they are restored.


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Brad.

A valve a day keeps the transistor away...


 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 06:59 on 2 January 2012.
's avatar
 Location: Tamworth, NSW.
 Member since 8 July 2011.
 Member #: 954
 Postcount: 10

Brad, you are correct about the radios having the light socket plugs on them from the factory. As I stated, houses didn't have many power points when they were built, mainly because of cost and the fact there wasn't a lot of electrical appliances back then. Our financial structure was a lot different also and most people could not afford the appliances that were available at the time. People also would buy a double adaptor for the light sockets and it was a common sight to see one in every room hanging from the ceiling. Light power supply, as you would know, didn't have an earth and it's a wonder people weren't electrocuted more often.


 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 16:09 on 2 January 2012.
's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW.
 Member since 15 November 2005.
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 4248

Our financial structure was a lot different...

No Bankcard ay Grin

Light power supply, as you would know, didn't have an earth and it's a wonder people weren't electrocuted more often.

Easy answer that one - lights seldom come into contact with people and most were just basic cord-grip lampholders so there was nothing to connect an earth wire to.


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Brad.

A valve a day keeps the transistor away...


 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 07:18 on 3 January 2012.
's avatar
 Location: Tamworth, NSW.
 Member since 8 July 2011.
 Member #: 954
 Postcount: 10

Brad I was referring more to the fact the double adaptors were left in place with those two exposed contacts and people were pluging / unpluging things like electric vac's on a regular basis. Also if anything went wrong with the appliance its earth lead wasn't worth two bob.

Yes, no bankcard and the pound was not floated. In those days a quid was worth a quid.

These days the dollar is worth what someone else in another country wants to make it, and its a similar story with the price of fuel.


 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 07:59 on 3 January 2012.
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 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW.
 Member since 15 November 2005.
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 4248

Yes, fingers in the socket would cause a problem.

I think the problem with the economy these days is that it is run by economists. When Bob and Quid left us the new dollar was worth US$1.62 because it was still tied to the Gold Standard and there were no petty excuses back then about how that exchange rate would harm local manufacturing because they had the brains to whack a tariff on imports, especially from countries where workers are paid slave labour rates and there's no workplace safety, insurances and tax regimes that put foreign companies on par with what we have here.

Now, unless the exchange rate is US$0.47 like it was around the time of the Sydney Olympics they say local manufacture isn't viable which I think is piffle. Since Coles and Woolworths dominate most retail markets, all they'd need do is stop buying the stuff and say to suppliers, "make it here or else..."


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Brad.

A valve a day keeps the transistor away...


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