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 BGE Television tuning knob - Model T212
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 4:55:05 PM on 16 August 2016.
John116's avatar
 Location: Blackheath, NSW
 Member since 29 October 2008
 Member #: 370
 Postcount: 38

Hi - I'm looking to buy a channel change knob (tuner knob) for a BGE model T212 television - hopefully someone out there has one they don't want.

BGE Channel Knob


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 5:14:10 PM on 16 August 2016.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 149

If you could show me what it looks like, I'll go through my knob boxes.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 5:24:58 PM on 16 August 2016.
MonochromeTV's avatar
 Location: Melbourne, VIC
 Member since 20 September 2011
 Member #: 1009
 Postcount: 906

Also should be the same as a STC T212.

I'll see if I have a picture when I get home.

UPDATE: The volume & tone control + on/off switch (inner & outer) knobs of the various STC T212 models is in the same style as the channel/fine tune knobs.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 2:59:26 PM on 18 August 2016.
Ian Robertson's avatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 624

If you've got the Volume knob and it's a matching style that I could use to create the silicone mould, I could cast you a replica in clear epoxy. You'd then need to drill and paint it. Stronger than the original. Only problem is it wouldn't have the channel numbers on it.

Is that the really early flat shaped black knob with the bar across the centre? Or the later jelly-mould style?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 4:57:23 PM on 31 August 2016.
John116's avatar
 Location: Blackheath, NSW
 Member since 29 October 2008
 Member #: 370
 Postcount: 38

Picture of knob now uploaded.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 11:36:36 AM on 3 September 2016.
Ian Robertson's avatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 624

Yes it's the later jelly-mould style.

Is the knob in the picture your broken one or from another TV?

If you still have the original outer shell, then it's easy to fill it with potting epoxy, you don't need to make a mould. When the epoxy sets, drill a 6.5mm hole down the middle and drill and tap the original fixing screw hole to take a suitable grub-screw - suggest 4mm if the original is missing.

I could be wrong but I recall the STC knobs used grub-screw fixing, not push-on like my AWA. Grub-screw fixing is easier to implement.

Just make sure there's no raised section on the FT knob that might spoil your plans! There was on my AWA so I had to turn a large groove into the epoxy to clear it.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 7:39:49 AM on 4 September 2016.
John116's avatar
 Location: Blackheath, NSW
 Member since 29 October 2008
 Member #: 370
 Postcount: 38

Thanks for the advice. The knob in the picture is from another TV of the same model.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 2:23:12 PM on 4 September 2016.
Ian Robertson's avatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 624

Well, I have enough materials left over from the AWA project to make a replica Channel knob, using the Volume knob (non-destructively) to make the mould if you like. You'll get a clear epoxy replica you can drill, tap and paint.

Or you can get the materials here:

http://aldax.com.au/rockdale_mould_making_supplies.htm

You will need:

Barnes Soft Trans condesation cure RTV-2 silicone
Aldax CrystalCast two-part epoxy
Some modelling clay is helpful to reduce the amount of silicone you'll need to use.

The way it works is you use the original knob to make a silicone mould.
After it sets in 8 to 15 hours, peel the mould off the original knob. It's quite stretchy but holds its original shape well enough.
Then mix up the epoxy and pour it into the mould. Read the instuctions carefully, you will need a kitchen scale or similar to measure the material. The mix quantities are very critical, they say. I had no trouble.
Come back in 24 to 72 hours (I didn't say it was fast!) peel off the mould and Voila!
The knob will seem slightly flexible at first but after a week or so it becomes rock-hard. Before it reaches this state it's quite easy to cut away any moulding flashes with a craft knife or even scissors but don't try to drill it until it's really hard.

For complex shapes (where a plain flat side won't cut it) you can make a 2 piece mould and use a large syringe to inject the epoxy. A drinking straw provides the air escape hole.

With a little care and ingenuity your replica will be indistinguishable from the original, particularly if you take the extra trouble to make it hollow and back-paint it.

The mould can be re-used quite a few times if you are careful or you stuff it up the first time.. And the resultant knobs are MUCH tougher than the originals.

For push-on knobs I use a dremel to make a cut where the flat will be and insert a small piece of sheet metal. If you have a router, that would be better.

This same method could be used to make just about any type of knob. You can add colours and fillers (available same place) to simulate bakelite or just about any coloured plastics.

Oh yes - for clear knobs that are back-painted, paint pens (and a steady hand) are your friends.

The only thing I haven't been able to match so far are those anodised aluminium inserts. People in TV factories used to refer to this type of thing as "jewellery"!


 
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