Welcome to Australia's only Vintage Radio and Television discussion forums. You are not logged in. Please log in below, apply for an account or retrieve your password.
Australian Vintage Radio Forums
  Home  ·  About Us  ·  Discussion Forums  ·  Glossary  ·  Outside Links  ·  Policies  ·  Services Directory  ·  Safety Warnings  ·  Tutorials

General Discussion

Forum home - Go back to General discussion

 Help from the brains trust . Removing stove element
« Back · 1 · Next »
 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 9:12:31 AM on 1 October 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 710

Hi all, knowing what a handy lot you are I was wondering if anyone knows how to remove the fan forced element on an Chef EGC631W stove it is one recessed into the cupboards with gas hot plates as a separate unit on top. The stove plugs into a 20 amp outlet. I have removed the cover from around the fan on the back of the stove this exposes the element . Does it unplug or do I need to pull the stove completely free of the cupboard and remove the back of the stove? I cannot find a service manual on line it is 18 years old and is low tech . No fancy electronic displays .
Regards Jim


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 10:03:40 AM on 1 October 2020.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 6148

I guess you are referring to the oven. Does this exploded parts diagram help?

https://www.appliancesupplies.com.au/m/chef/cooker-electric/egc631w


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 12:28:44 PM on 1 October 2020.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4474

They look like a push on connector. If it comes out via the the oven one would expect the terminal to be in the oven, or the element ends go through the wall into the back. If its easy it was likely a design fail.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 8:36:08 PM on 1 October 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 710

Thank you for your replys .
I was trying to avoid removing the stove from where it is however it looks like I have no choice.
Some stoves you can just remove a couple of retaining screw and withdraw the element, it appears it is not the case with this.
Regards .Jim


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 11:31:43 AM on 2 October 2020.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6545

Most stoves made in the last thirty years don't employ a plug-in element for the oven. Some do for electric cooktops/stovetops but that's another story for another time.

You will need to pull the back off, after unplugging the range from the wall. There will be a spade lug at each end of the element and possibly a third for an earth wire spot welded to the element's casing. These simply slip off. Some elements support themselves whilst others are attached to the back wall of the oven chamber with spring clips.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 3:09:22 PM on 2 October 2020.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4474

Caution may be required, some of those stoves are hard wired. So you may need the Modiewark etc. to make sure its electrically dead.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 5:58:27 PM on 2 October 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 710

Thanks Brad and Marc. Yea I am showing my age received the new element today and it is as you say Brad spade connectors all the way . The stove unplugs from the 20 amp outlet so that is good . Tomorrows project . I find anything I have to do these days causes instant stress .I was never like this . Wife keeps telling me I should have had it done by someone , never had much success with that approach. I would find it embarrassing to call someone in . So I will get stuck in tomorrow.
Regards Jim


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 12:09:10 PM on 3 October 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 710

All good I installed the new element that came yesterday. I did have to remove the stove from its under bench position, remove back to access the spade connectors and two retaining clips in the oven to release element quite straight forward. Not sure what people use to clean oven with had to use a scraper and the high pressure cleaner to clean the door.
RegardsJim


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 7:59:40 PM on 3 October 2020.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1987

You can get spray on oven cleaners that do a good job. What I do is take the whole oven outside and wash it out with a hose.

Most ovens have clips on the hinges you can flip into place, this allows you to lift the door off. Makes the job much easier.

My son Pete is a chef - his advice for oven cleaners is to look for the one with the direst warning labels. It has to say DANGER in large letters. If you see one like that, buy it, it will be the only one that works!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 9:26:16 AM on 4 October 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 710

Thanks Ian . Most will not agree but I am really not into cleaning ovens normally, as you have pointed out Ian those chemicals are very nasty. I think the health risks using them are far too great . The oven temperature is enough to kill any germs lurking about .
The less toxic oven cleaners I agree with you are useless .
Regards Jim


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 6:50:35 PM on 4 October 2020.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6545

I agree with Ian - if there is a skull and crossbones on the label, that is what I will use. The trick is just making sure you have lots of O2 around you. Open windows, turn on the exhaust fan, etc. Let the oven cop the stick. The enamel inside can handle it.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 2:48:51 PM on 6 October 2020.
Irext's avatar
 Location: Werribee South, VIC
 Member since 30 September 2016
 Member #: 1981
 Postcount: 404

By far the best oven cleaner I've found so far is "Oven Power".
It comes as a kit with the cleaning solution and a large sealable plastic bag and gloves.
You put all the shelves in the plastic bag with a fair amount of the cleaner, seal it up and work it until all the shelves are covered in the goo.
Then you coat all the inside surfaces and the door of the oven with the rest of the goo.
I leave the oven for a couple of hours and the racks in the bag over night.
There are no nasty fumes and the racks, which I used to hate cleaning, come out like new.
I take them outside and hit them with the hose to clean off the goo.
The oven also comes out very clean and the goo is washed off easily with a wet sponge and a bucket.
The oven is 25 years old but looks new after this treatment and my lungs and sanity are intact!


 
« Back · 1 · Next »
 You need to be a member to post comments on this forum.

Sign In

Username:
Password:
 Keep me logged in.
Do not tick box on a computer with public access.