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 A good day for a drive.
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 2:38:56 PM on 25 August 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 645

We took out the 1974 Mercedes for a run today to blow out the cobwebs has not been used for the last month. Do not like leaving them unused for longer than that. We went to Kiama had a walk along the edge of the harbour then had a nice lunch. I was a bit hesitant having something to eat but the cafe seemed to be doing the right thing . It made a pleasant change came, back via Jambaroo it was nice looking at the green fields and dairy cattle.
Regards Jim


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 6:52:14 PM on 25 August 2020.
Fred Lever's Gravatar
 Location: Toongabbie, NSW
 Member since 19 November 2015
 Member #: 1828
 Postcount: 872

Hi JimB, when i'm well enough (and my left leg is strong enough to operate the clutch) I must run the 1964 Morris around the block a bit and do ditto.
Had to swap out the seizing clutch master cylinder and flush all the hydraulic systems a couple of months ago.
Just sitting in a workshop is no good for any vehicle.
There is not much rubber to age in a vehicle of that age but systems do seize up from lack of heat cycling from under use.
The hydraulic fluids were chocko full of water and corrosion nasty in the iron parts bits like cylinders and pistons.
Fred.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 9:56:23 AM on 26 August 2020.
Jimb's Gravatar
 Location: Kanahooka, NSW
 Member since 18 November 2016
 Member #: 2012
 Postcount: 645

The hydraulics seem to suffer quite quickly through lack of use . I make sure it goes for a good hard run once a month at least . I guess if this dreaded virus goes away it will be out more especially with summer around the corner.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 12:06:03 PM on 27 August 2020.
Tinkera123's Gravatar
 Location: Melbourne, VIC
 Member since 5 October 2009
 Member #: 555
 Postcount: 410

Mmmmm .... had a 1967 MGB ... partly restored when I bought it ... bodywork and engine rebuilt .... very rewarding doing all the work to finish it off ... refurbed mechanicals .... learnt to tune twin SU's and warm cam ... total re-wire etc .... made it ultra reliable and quite safe .... took it for a run through our Dandenong Ranges once a week .... these days, cannot do that in Melb..


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
Cheers, Ian

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 12:59:33 PM on 27 August 2020.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6333

I still have a yearning for an FC Holden. It's not in the price range at the moment, for the car itself or the replacement floorpan.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 2:05:13 PM on 27 August 2020.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1895

I restored an FC in the 60s Brad. Brakes from an EK and steering from an HR. Front seats from a Peugeot 404. Rear anti-roll bar, good shocks, radials, recalibrated front end. 3.55 diff. Grey motor to EJ spec. A good mate of mine cut out the cancer. Original beige and green colour scheme. A nice pleasant to drive long-distance cruiser.

It got thoroughly written off when we were slammed into by an LJ Torana that tried to take a corner at 140km/h and hit the gravel, in 1973.

I still miss it!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 2:35:53 PM on 27 August 2020.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6333

It's a shame they didn't galvanise the old cars like they did with the late model Commodores. My car is from 2003 and not so much as a square mm of rust anywhere. There'd be a lot more of them still on the road today if rust wasn't an issue. Unfortunately, the Fred Flinstone method of propelling a car doesn't work in the real world.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 4:55:14 PM on 27 August 2020.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4329

I haven't restored the MKII Zephyr. It did get a fuel pump refit early in the year and still needs the hay blasting out of the tray from it last trip. Its never been unregistered since 1958. so still has its original plates.

The pain with the hydraulics is the brake fluid. Being Glycol which is an alcohol, it does like water. It also dries into a glue and decomposes into a corrosive. Modern master cylinders are semi sealed with a diaphragm: That merely reduces the problem. By clever design we have an Aluminium piston in a cast iron cylinder, creating "foreign battery" and exacerbates the problem by adding electrolytic corrosion.

This genius is also manifest in the popular use of Alloy water pumps & Thermostat housings. The TE20-D here being repurposed metal from the War has a lot of Aluminium & Durallium and I replaced the Alloy thermostat housings in the 70's. MKII and tractor water pump are cast iron its only the seal & bearing that wear out so are fixable. Thermo housing on MKII is cast iron.

The answer to the Brakes is "Silicone" brake fluid as you then only have replace the seals every 10 to 15 years. No brake cylinder replaced since LH front in 1970's. Silicone is water repellent, so no corrosion. The radiator 1951 in the tractor is original, ute one is 1980's as it got damaged. The head was taken off the tractor October last year: No corrosion worth worrying about & the block in the ute was clean a few years back and the water pump casting as new. The secret, even in 1950's cast iron systems: Corrosion inhibitor. Watch the concentration, if it dilutes to far it becomes corrosive. Engines here run well on Shell diesel spec. oil, it keeps them clean internally and they get very old.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 7:16:36 PM on 27 August 2020.
Fred Lever's Gravatar
 Location: Toongabbie, NSW
 Member since 19 November 2015
 Member #: 1828
 Postcount: 872

Hi Marc, yeah even with modern fluid water accumulates.
It is just non use really, parts just jam up.

Agree with the cooling fluid.
I changed the cooling system to a expansion tank set up so the rad was full of fluid under pressure all the time and laced it with inhibitor.
Top up in the spill bottle.
No more cooling problems and clean brass and cast iron insides!

Fred.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 8:17:34 PM on 27 August 2020.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4329

Fred. That's the beauty of the Silicone: Water absorption does not happen & even after sitting for over a month sometimes, at no time in 50 years has a cylinder locked.

Marc


 
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