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 Taking things back to bunnies!!
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 5:16:27 PM on 16 August 2020.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1993

I had to buy a new drill, Not because I need a drill really ,As I have plenty of corded drills kicking about the place,..All my power tools are corded because I don't do any on site work and so I prefer corded as the sand batter and drill better for the type of work I do.
But I needed a battery drill to do the shed down the back so I went to buy one and must admit I didn't want to buy one.!!!
So I looked at every brand in Bunnings Makita, DeWalt AGE... Everyone was made in China ! Everyone! Except Bosch which is made in Malaysia so I picked the Bosch .
Guess what ,no stock!!! Shit! So I went to Total tools , no Bosch, Gas weld, no Bosch in stock and all other brands are from China!
Ok I give up ,I will go buy China drill and just get the shed done and as they are all made in China I will buy a cheapie!
So I bought a Ozito and 4 packets of screws.
That's 200 screws.
On the 3rd pack the Drill died!!! Hmm not surprised of course, So I take the drill back to Bunnings as it has 5 year warranty and get my money back . Now I'm back to square one again, So I look at all the drills again and ever one said ,Made in china. So I bought a DeWalt 708. ..made in China !!!! .one can only try I thought !!!
Well that's taken all bloody day , try to do the shed next weekend!

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 7:07:19 PM on 16 August 2020.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6333

At least witth the Dewalt it is a premium brand so it'll do the job. Dewalt pretty much have the gutsiest motors of any battery drill. Whilst there's a few good brands such as Bosch and Milwaukee, I chose Dewalt back in 1998 when their gear was made in Great Britain and stuck with them just because I wanted as few different types of batteries as possible.

With Ozito, it is a case of getting what one pays for. In 2005 I bought an Ozito jigsaw for my workshop at work and it cost $30.00 (not a typo). Trust me - that is all it was worth. It couldn't cut through melted butter with a diamond-tipped blade fitted.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 7:20:29 PM on 16 August 2020.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5997

A couple of 25 metre extension cords would have been cheaper.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 7:28:42 PM on 16 August 2020.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1993

Oh yes, The DeWalt looks good. Ive not used it yet , but I don't expect any problem.
I have had DeWalt stuff before. I had one of there palm Sanders for years and it was great.
Made in America .but when it wore out I replaced it with another DeWalt and by this stage it was China making them and it did not last .
Mainly because the bases use to be metal when they were made in the USA,
not plastic as they made them in China.
Bunnings were fine and refunded my money no problems what so ever and I felt that was great.

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 7:39:22 PM on 16 August 2020.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1993

GTC, no G, not practical using 240 volt drill for " screw driving" great drills, but not as a driver and we're talking about 1500 screws. it's a board and batten shed, Cape cod design and built from 25mm thick planks that run vertical.
Lots timber in this design...all timber.
But the frames are all finished now so it's getting there.

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 7:56:58 PM on 16 August 2020.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5997

Time for some photos.

I assembled an aluminum garden shed from a kit in the 1970s, with a screwdriver. Took me all day and half way through I wished I was ambidextrous to give my right wrist some relief.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 8:07:29 PM on 16 August 2020.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1993

Actually G, that's one reason I wanted to build my own wood shed, I helped a guy put one of these garden sheds together and it was a bloody nightmare, nothing lined up. It was flimsy...never again ,so I decided to build a wood one..like everything though it's costing more than I thought it would,but I am enjoying building it ...no stress


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 8:19:41 PM on 16 August 2020.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5997

As far as I know, the one I put up is still there (sold the house years ago). One of these days when I'm in the area I ought to go take a peek. I had a concrete slab laid for it. It was manufactured by a well known brand, whose name escapes me at the moment, but it was very similar to this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cn8nZA9erLw


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 8:30:30 PM on 16 August 2020.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1993

I see, I think brand would play a big part in how well it goes together.
The one that I helped a friend with was large and I'm guessing it may of been a cheap brand.
Wood sheds are nice ,but it's a big job on my own so Rome is not getting built in a Day of course. I only do it on the weekends.,plus I'm learning something new as I'm not a builder so that makes it interesting.

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 9:58:19 PM on 16 August 2020.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4329

I have given up on any of those Bunny Rabbit type places & their barely hobby class battery drills. The batteries in the Ozito were all size & no weight and as with most of these the battery is the weakest link. I am convinced that they deliberately supply a second battery that is destined to fail quickly. I now have a Milwaukie, and a savage beast that is. The torque of it is amazing & it gets quite a bit of torture driving in roof screws, or destroying Bunny Rabbit square drive driver bits.

That drill was from an industrial supplier, as was the aging Hammer Drill (Bosch 1980's) Die Grinder (Bosch 1980's) Angle Grinder (Makita 1990's) Air drill (Chicago Pneumatic 1975) The latter is great for blind rivets drills and really wet situations (high rpm) Torque savage. Shearing shed (1952) Pump shed (1962) Chaff Shed (Log pre-1900) were actually built by immediate family. New doors for garage & 100+ year old shed I have built.

Not a builder applies next door. Grandfather was a carpenter & did a lot of training dodging shells in France in WW1. I had basically done a building apprenticeship with him before I left state school & moved to a technical one where there was more carpentry. So next door set out to build a carport for the new wife's car. On learning how he was going about it (steel) he was warned about levels and the ground was not level etc.

About a week later: Problem. Six uprights concreted into the ground, all different height's: Cute. So over to the situation with the newer survey level & a paint marker to sort it out. So there was a bit of angle grinder work & welding at the tops to sort that out. However, its now only about 2mm out anywhere.

Marc


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 7:19:24 AM on 17 August 2020.
STC830's Gravatar
 Location: NSW
 Member since 10 June 2010
 Member #: 681
 Postcount: 939

GTC re your post #8
I have built a smaller version of this shed bought from Harvey Norman on special, to store fuel, oil and paint out of the house. Also store the old spare mower there. Have covered the roof with 90% shade cloth to help keep it cool. Will have a look today and see if I can find the brand
Erected it on 600mm six (2x3) concrete slabs. Preparation for the slabs was most of the work -digging, leveling, road base then sand. Then lay slabs, silicon the gaps and seal the slabs to keep the moisture out, and cover that with thick plastic sheet to provide a bund for spillage. Bolted down with lots of small loxens.

Second steel shed like this that I have built. Have used pop rivets as well as the supplied screws.

Would rather have laid a slab but it is over a drainage/sewage easement. Local rules allow a structure that can be moved easily.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 8:50:47 AM on 17 August 2020.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5997

.STC830: I seem to recall I bought my shed kit from Hunter Douglas. Like you I did all the prep for the slab. I then paid a guy with a mini-crete business to layout the reo and pour the slab.

Also bolted down with Loxins, its main purpose was to store mower, trimmer, petrol, oil, kero, garden chemicals, etc, down the back of the yard away from the house.

I didn't bother with bunding, but did seal the base with silcone compound to keep water out.

I'm really getting interested in going to see if it's still standing some 50 years later.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 9:18:50 AM on 17 August 2020.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4329

I am not a great fan of Loxins in certain situations as winds here can get to100mph: Last nasty one 126KMph. I prefer to concrete the thread in.

On that, serious mistake: I bought pre-mix cement from the Rabbit Hutch. Little more than Mortar it actually turned to a cheese 7 had to be dug out, which could be done with a shovel. So it was back to hand mix using roughly washed sand from the creek (a pink quartz hill scree) The old house had verandahs made of that & it never cracked even that there was no reo in it.

You put the plastic where? Normally moisture is controlled by putting chemical in the concrete & putting a layer of plastic down before pouring the slabs, or putting down pre-cast. (reo sits on plastic "chairs" to hold it off of the bottom. One does that to steel posts to seal under it.).

Slabs on the box type septic lids and other concrete ones are cast with lifting eyes in them. One can do that with a thought out small shed: lift it intact on the slab.

Marc


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 14 · Written at 9:19:03 AM on 17 August 2020.
STC830's Gravatar
 Location: NSW
 Member since 10 June 2010
 Member #: 681
 Postcount: 939

I bunded because there is a creek over the back fence going to an estuary. I don't go near it for months at a time especially in winter so a leak would go unnoticed. It is simply two layers of thick black plastic held down and protected with rubber mats. Not very high (20mm or so) but would easily hold a leaked 5l petrol or oil container.

It had to be moved a bit when a sewer manhole arrangement that goes about 3m into the ground in front of the shed "rose" out of the ground about 25mm in front of the shed when the clay soil shrunk during the drought. This disrupted the slabs and allowed surface water underneath the front of the slabs, washing some sand and road-base out. Before it was on ten slabs, now it is on six but shows no signs of blowing away. So that was a couple more days work and more to go to tidy the area up.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 15 · Written at 9:33:33 AM on 17 August 2020.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1993

GTC

" getting interested in going back""

I was born in Ryde and mum and Dad bought a house in Ryde, but when I was 4 my dad passed away at home one night and in time my mum and I left that house and moved up to the snowy for a while.
About 5 years ago I found out the house in Ryde was going to be demolished..
Pearl my daughter was only a Buba then and I was driving near Ryde and decided to go to the old house.
It was empty and a wreck. Not like when dad was about as he was an Aircraft engineer ,but loved gardens and spent his weekends making the place look good.
But now it was a wreck.
I went around the back of the house and opened up the back door and went inside.
I spent a couple of hours there and I saw things that were still there from our past. Just little things under the house and in the hall cupboards. The house seemed much smaller and It was hard to imagine how 4 kids and 2 adults lived in it. That area was some type of army barracks during the war and as a boy I would often find gun shells when digging in the yard. I'm not sure how old I was when I left that house, 7 perhaps ,but I still remember many things there.
It's all been bulldozed now and modern houses are now on the block.
But I had quite a visit going back there.

Pete



 
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