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 Restoration of a 1939 HMV 904 5-inch TV, with 3-band AM Receiver
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 4:59:42 PM on 23 October 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5176

Those into vintage TV will enjoy the very detailed article by Dr Hugo Holden in the November 2018 issue of Silicon Chip.

He acquired the set from the Early Television Foundation in the USA and performed a bare chassis restoration. He also constructed a 405-line video converter so he could recreate the signal generated by the original BBC Alexandra Palace transmitter.

Here's an example of that set: http://www.earlytelevision.org/images/hmv_904.jpg


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 11:38:02 PM on 25 October 2018.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 580

For a private museum, the ETF has an enviable collection of pre-war British TVs!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 12:25:01 PM on 27 October 2018.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1269

The Early Television Foundation in Hilliard Ohio is a must-see place when you are doing your US road trip!

I couldn't be there on the weekend so the guy opened it up for me and let me have the run of the place! Vintage TV nirvana!
You can watch many early TVs, including pre-war mirror-in-lid sets, actually working.

The 1949 RCA TV transmitter is pretty amazing too.

Hugo Holden's story of the restoration first appeared on the ETF site some years back.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 9:38:08 PM on 16 November 2018.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
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Unique, I would say, to the ETF is their 'mechanical television room' where one can view working pre-1935 mechanical TVs:
As I always wanted to see one of these, it was a pleasant surprise to be able to compare working models from US & UK side by side:
You can see why these failed to catch on: the only ones making a serious attempt at a viable picture quality being BAIRD [UK] where poor John Logie Baird threw himself - and his investors' money - wholeheartedly into this technology only to see it all collapse with the advent of an all-electronic Farnsworth-inspired system!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 10:55:43 PM on 16 November 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5176

Baird himself speaking about his apparatus in 1937: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSkRkh7JncQ

A nice explanation of the principle here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSkRkh7JncQ

A wonderful docudrama "The Fools on the Hill" was produced by the BBC in 1986 ...

Trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-bqGFTWbGQ

Full program here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCtijZAQJEY


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 1:05:37 PM on 17 November 2018.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
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 Postcount: 580

Thanks for links, will have to check them out.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 2:27:02 PM on 17 November 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5176

Seeing that 1986 docudrama reminds me of the time when TV was worth watching.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 10:29:42 PM on 17 November 2018.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 580

Watching the show, I was puzzled by the man next to Baird with an even heavier accent than Baird's Scottish brogue:
"Was it Zworykin visiting from the 'states?" I thought.
Had to "scan" (no pun intended) the closing credits to catch his name: 'Issac Shoenberg'.
I was unaware of this historical character; turns out he was EMI's chief scientist, thus Baird's nemesis.
How ironic that the two electronic giants, RCA-EMI, on each side of the Atlantic both had Russian chief scientists!


 
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