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 220v vs 240v
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 11:35:29 AM on 10 February 2019.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 495

Just asking for some advice here. My darling wife bought me a you beaut soldering gun for my birthday, it's rated a t 60w and has a US style plug and she also bought me an adapter. It looks really neat, only it has 220v stamped on it and here in Clare we have a quite healthy 240-245 volts ant the power point. I had a soldering iron a couple of years ago rated at 220v and it gave up the ghost after about 6 months of relatively infrequent use. I am just wondering if there is anything I can do to hose 20 volts off, maybe run it through a dim bulb, but I'm thinking that would only lower current? I have a 240 to 110 volt step down transformer. Would that work ok ? Would I lose heat or would it just draw more amps at 110v to make up the watts to 60? I'm really wondering about the best way to be able to use it without shortening it's life? Cheers.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 12:36:25 PM on 10 February 2019.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5017

Brand and model?

Frankly, I'd just go ahead and use it. Heating elements are not normally too fussy about voltage as long as it's not way over the rated value.

Dim bulb presents a series resistance so becomes a voltage divider. The bulb filament's cold resistance is lower than its hot resistance, by an order of magnitude.

You could possibly use a rheostat in the from of a stove element control, but you'd probably end up spending enough to buy a Chinese (Jaycar) 240 volt iron outright.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 4:41:59 PM on 10 February 2019.
Robbbert's avatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 18 September 2015
 Member #: 1801
 Postcount: 967

I think you need a 73 ohm resistor which will dissipate 5.45 Watts. You might be able to find something suitable in your spare parts box.

Or just use it, as GTC said. I would.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 5:28:12 PM on 10 February 2019.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 3392

The current goes up with the voltage if the resistance is constant. One has to know what the heating element is? A wire element will increase in resistance with heat, carbon goes the other way.

There is no issue with a step down transformer, if it has the ratings but one would like the correct voltage. Rating also comes down to how long it can be run under load. Do be careful & I now have Three ways of stepping down. as I acquired the third in a job lot recently, another Variac (Slide transformer) making two of them: These and a 220V to 110V one that can be reversed & used to step up, do not provide isolation from the mains. These are called auto transformers.

To get the correct voltage for some radio's, which will not safely handle 115V or, more the rigmarole where isolation is needed involves a 1:1 isolation transformer, & Variac: Sometimes with a third transformer.

I did have an issue with HV like that, as the last time they did work on the transformer they damaged the seals & it was starting to pass 250. After 250V its illegal & it got replaced, the new one is set for 240V at the unit. That will be helpful for the solar units albeit the searing heat is causing most of their output to be gobbled up. I was impressed that the increased use (swampy can run 9am to 01:00) saw only a $36 difference in the bill average. No HW heater its Solar.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 8:35:04 PM on 10 February 2019.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 495

Thanks guys! I might just use it and find a 10w 75 ohm resistor in the mean time. Cheers.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 10:53:31 PM on 10 February 2019.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 864

If anyone needs a soldering Iron,, just forget Jay Car !
Go down to Total Tools!
I needed one and I went down there and they had a heap to choose from ,

Weller! and it said " made in Australia " been a long time since Ive seen that written anywhere .

The two brands I could see were Weller and Cresent
Weller 25 w was about $45
Weller 60W was around $60
Cresent was not a lot cheaper by memory and think a 40w was $30.
But they had the best selection Ive seen around the place. Lot better than our local jay car choice of crap.
They also had stations ,but I was only after a small hand Iron for hard to get into areas and not wanting to lash out station this time.

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 12:39:55 PM on 11 February 2019.
Irext's avatar
 Location: Werribee South, VIC
 Member since 30 September 2016
 Member #: 1981
 Postcount: 132

On the subject of soldering irons, I have a Weller WTCP (magnetic curie effect tips) soldering station which was a gift when I was 18. I am now 61 and still using the Weller iron which is still going strong, and I can still buy the tips!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 1:20:38 PM on 11 February 2019.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 3392

I bought two from Matson in1968. The small one (25W) failed around 2012. The big one has plug in elements (3) one seems to have a sagged element as the RCD circuit breaker occasionally trips. One is dead & the other is still going. Weller (25W) is getting old.

Bought 2 from J, lemons, both too hot, would not tin properly, & died in no time.

Marc


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 2:27:50 PM on 11 February 2019.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 525

QUOTE:"Weller WTCP (magnetic curie effect tips) soldering station"

Can be found used on eBay, they start at maybe $60, but well worth it!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 4:29:32 PM on 11 February 2019.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 495

This is a 60 watt one which looks like a gun. It has a reel on the back for the solder which apparently feeds in when you pull the gun's trigger, a bit like a mig welder. I've never used such a thing, but my wife was sweet for buying it for me so I'm going to give it a shot and it seems to look like it will solve my common dilemma of needing a third hand to hold the solder! Hopefully it will make life easier. My other iron is 100w and I like it because it is very hot and can melt solder to the chassis and tends to thoroughly melt all of the solder when attaching components, eliminating dry joints, although I often have to hold position like Marcel Marceu until the solder solidifies! But I'm hoping this gun thingy is as useful as it looks and I can get the hang of using it ok.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 4:42:00 PM on 11 February 2019.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5017

This is a 60 watt one which looks like a gun. It has a reel on the back for the solder

Like this?

https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1arWmJpXXXXadXpXXq6xXFXXXf/60W-manual-soldering-gun-automatic-solder-wire-feeding-tool-electric-soldering-iron-weld-for-repair-combo.jpg_640x640.jpg


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 11:20:16 AM on 12 February 2019.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1220

If it has a thermostat (i.e. is temperature controlled) the 10% extra voltage won't matter.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 2:42:48 PM on 12 February 2019.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5154

Weller irons were my choice as a kid for doing Jaycar and Dick Smith kits. They stood the test of time and, yep, made in Australia. Weller and Crescent are both Coopertools brands. Crescent have always been my choice for electrician's pliers - also made in Australia.

I'd use the iron that has been the main topic in this thread. 220V is available in US households for heavy appliances but they are normally fitted with plug tops with the Australian pin pattern (US pins are a few mm shorter than ours but are all inter-operable). Member WA2SIE has posted photos of these before.

If it's rated at 220V though and the element was wound to exacting tolerances, a shorter life can probably be expected. Otherwise it would probably go the distance.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 14 · Written at 2:47:35 PM on 12 February 2019.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5017

Coopertools brands

Later became Apex Tools, which is now owned by Bain Capital.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 15 · Written at 9:47:48 PM on 12 February 2019.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 495

Yes GTC! That's the type! Are they good to work with?


 
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