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 Record Changer Support To Enable Repairs
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 3:31:56 PM on 21 May 2018.
MichaelB's Gravatar
 Location: Maleny, QLD
 Member since 16 April 2018
 Member #: 2238
 Postcount: 6

Just wondering if any members have constructed a viable support mechanism for record changers (especially BSR and Garrard) which allows repairs to be done with the the changer cycling.

Currently I use various sizes of wooden blocks but invariably the changer slips off and the process becomes a pain in the proverbial.

Years ago a fellow tech developed a system of chains and hooks but from memory it wasn't all that successful.

Any bright ideas?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 9:04:18 PM on 21 May 2018.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5498

Three or four dowels that fit into well positioned holes on a similar sized sheet of plywood is probably the quickest way to set up. They can be made tall enough so you can see under the turntable whilst testing.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 10:37:52 PM on 21 May 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5262

dowels that fit into well positioned holes on a similar sized sheet of plywood

Similar to this:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JyP5gOmBIUk/Tojt8idkP1I/AAAAAAAAGU4/uqI13qrfygY/s640/IMG_20111002_155715.jpg

Another style for working on radio chassis is the 'rotisserie' style:

http://radiostands.com/dimensions.html


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 12:16:55 AM on 22 May 2018.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5498

Yep, same as that.

Next time I set up my workshop again I am going to go down a slightly different path though. I will set up two sash clamps on a weighted arm (like a Planet desk lamp but much bigger and stronger) so that a chassis or turntable can be tilted in any direction for even easier repair.

Such an undertaking is not a five minute job though.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 10:46:00 PM on 12 August 2018.
Arty41's Gravatar
 Location: Brisbane, QLD
 Member since 18 September 2010
 Member #: 118
 Postcount: 289

This is my proto type that I've used for many years, needs refining but it works for me. I designed it to fold away and at the same time keep the right hand side clear of all the workings. A mirror placed at the bottom shows the action in process. The side have a plastic runner to hold the sides in place as well as protecting the paint work on the record player.
Rudy.

Turntable support
Turntable support
Turntable support
Turntable support
Turntable support
Turntable support


 
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