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 How to loosen 50 year old grease in Garrard turntable.
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 16 · Written at 1:32:06 PM on 6 January 2018.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1800

Silicone spray is bad news as a contact cleaner and WD40, CRC2.26, RP7 all cause frequency shift in VHF tuned circuits and should NEVER be randomly sprayed into tuners. Silver polish,followed by alcohol bath followed by compressed air is my proven method.

But WD40 &c is great for rusted, siezed MECHANICAL things. As a teenager I once got a solidly siezed engine running after 30 years of disuse by emptying a can of 2.26 into the plug holes and letting it sit for a week.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 17 · Written at 4:31:16 PM on 6 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1902

Every day I thank the Stars I dont work on cars for a living anymore,
but when I did many cars still had points and distributors and as Ian just said, you use metho after cleaning them and even a new set you always clean with metho.
I used to often freak people out when I would just set the timing on the cars using a radio, you just turn the radio off the channel and set the crank shaft into position and then turn the distributor until you heard the spark, at that point the contacts have open. This system is fine for a run around .
I use to also tune twin carbies with just a garden hose stuck in my Ear, this way I could hear which one was sucking more . But the biggest sucker of all was me ! Why on earth did I ever do that for a living!
While on on this topic ,older cars use condensers on the distributor and when the condenser is failing you get a pinnacle on the contacts and so you replace the condenser, but if you leave the old condenser on there and put a new one on as well ,the new condenser will repair the old one in only a short time.
Im told their micra? And this is well known . how this works I'm not sure.

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 18 · Written at 4:58:54 PM on 7 January 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5841

Horses for courses. I'm well aware of silicone's reputation in the areas you mention, but silicone oil is a good non-conductive lubricant for certain applications and it's just one of the weapons in my armoury.

For contact cleaning I use contact cleaner.

I only ever use graphite powder for locks. Any locksmith who uses WD-40 isn't worth the title.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 19 · Written at 7:05:44 PM on 7 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Albury, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1902

Yep I agree about the locks
I use Graphite and I think wd 40 would stuff a Tumbler
Like all the Trades there gone to the dogs now. A lock smith would be no different.
Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 20 · Written at 2:00:16 AM on 8 January 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5841

I think wd 40 would stuff a Tumbler

WD-40 might have been designed as a water dispersant but it attracts all sorts of other stuff, including dirt, and apart from its penchant for dissolving certain plastics (as well as turps it contains xylene), the dirt bit is my main gripe against it. So, yes, it will promote the gumming up of tumbler locks.

The biggest joke is the claim that it's a lubricant. Turps and xylene are the antitheses of a lubricant!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 21 · Written at 6:50:51 AM on 8 January 2018.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6183

WD-40 will work on freeing the parts in a lock. The downside to it (for most purposes) is that because it is oil based it attracts dust and that is the biggest enemy for a lock.

Graphite is the best option for a lock (and other small brass mechanisms) but it is hard to get in powder form now. Most places sell it in small crystals, like sugar crystals and they don't take to the moving parts inside the lock very well. Silicone spray is also good for locks because, like graphite, it doesn't attract dust and dirt. I've been in charge of registered key/lock systems in places I've worked for a long time and silicone spray has been a proven performer for Bilock, Lockwood, Assa Abloy and others.

The best thing about silicone spray is that it doesn't smell.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 22 · Written at 1:16:14 PM on 8 January 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5841

it is hard to get in powder form now

This is what I use:

https://www.bunnings.com.au/hordern-50gm-graphite-powder_p5810046


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 23 · Written at 3:29:40 PM on 30 January 2018.
Sue's avatar
 Sue
 Location: Daylesford, VIC
 Member since 13 January 2011
 Member #: 809
 Postcount: 311

I use Inox MX3 very freely, the makers claim it won't go sticky. And even though it's not food grade, it's Kosher! Bizarre, huh?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 24 · Written at 8:23:24 PM on 30 January 2018.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 6183

There is a difference between silicon and silicone and it's important not to confuse the two. Silicon is a natural element whilst silicone is silicon with other chemicals added to change its purpose.

The only reason a locksmith would use an oil-based lube on a lock is because they want repeat business.

It sounds like my cupboards look a bit like GTC's - the only WD-40 products I use are silicone spray and Solvol soap. I've never had any issues with silicone spray affecting paint, though at the same time I don't leave residue on any surfaces that don't need lubricating. My main uses for it are to quieten hinges, lubricate curtain tracks and clean oval cylinders on my workplace registered lock system.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 25 · Written at 12:08:24 AM on 31 March 2018.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4191

A grease I use is Inox mx6 which is a static grease it is more resistant to drying. Their MX8 is more suited to bearings (like in power tools) where mx6 may be overly absorbed into the bearing. MX6 is food grade. It comes in 30G tubes with a nozzle point.

Don't use engine oil that is designed to absorb water.

I did comment elsewhere on a Garrard, or two with grease soap drying out, It happens in automotive as well. The one in a "Rolls" Stereogram here looks like it was never designed to be got out, & its as noted, same as this post, and others, locked up with dry grease soap.

Just be thankful that its not one particular run of BSR: I have had one of them here. The platter bearing actually welds and hell an damnation. nor a crowbar will get that platter off.


 
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