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 How to loosen 50 year old grease in Garrard turntable.
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 5:06:35 PM on 31 December 2017.
Zeerust's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 29 September 2016
 Member #: 1979
 Postcount: 48

I have a Garrard 1000 turntable which seems to be in workable condition, except that a few parts are frozen by hardened lubricant, at least that's my guess. What would be the best way to loosen this parts so that I can disassemble them and give them a good clean? For now I've just used a bit of WD-40, but some parts are stubborn. Also, if I do get it running again, what kind of lubricants should I use to recondition it? Thanks in advance.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 6:36:32 PM on 31 December 2017.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 320

I generally use kero for safe cleaning.
WES sell a yellow long life grease for all the mechanical gears and levers.
Sewing machine oil for ball and roller bearings.
However be aware that some of the older bronze bushed motor bearings are impregnated with a lubricant. And sewiing oil can mess with this unless the bearing is thoroughly cleaned with kero, dried and then only one drop of sewing oil.
Whatever you use, like a car they will need reasonably regular service. Depending on usage.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 11:11:38 PM on 31 December 2017.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

I heat them up with a heat gun on low and all the ancient grease comes out. I Then wash them out with Alcohol or metho.
Some parts require grease others its oil.
Also if it has rubber parts grease or petroleum products will rot the rubbers fast.
Many guys use silicon grease and that works for them. I use a rubber safe grease by nulon and if its oil I'm looking at than, just good old fashion singer machine oil.
Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 10:53:22 AM on 1 January 2018.
Zeerust's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 29 September 2016
 Member #: 1979
 Postcount: 48

Thanks Pete. I didn't think about the heat gun. I'm currently soaking a stubborn part in kero. No rubber involved, all metal. I assume this is no problem for any reason? Cheers.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 11:58:55 AM on 1 January 2018.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 320

The reason I mentioned Kero, is that Metho will attack many of the old paints.
I have ruined a few items in my past experience when a run of unseen metho has left a permanent mark on paintwork.
And although WD40 is a very handy cleaning and lubricating product. It is only used as a very temporary repair.(Backyarders).
It makes a sticky mess which attracts dust which then seizes things.
Do not mention WD40 to a Clockmaker, your ears may burn as a consequence.
Although it does soften hard grease. Smile.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 12:00:51 PM on 1 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

Hello,
Even a hair dryer works to activate the old grease.
Its all metal, kero wont hurt it.
Plus johnny would know he has about 40 years experience.
I just prefer alcohol or metho as it removes residue.
Turn tables are reliable, its just that the grease turns to glue over the years, this is because most grease has an amount of soap in it from manufacturers and its the soap that dries hard and the turntable freezes.
You also need to use a grease that stays where you put it, things like molybond grease are great ,,but not for turntables as it moves around too much and falls out.

Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 12:10:28 PM on 1 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

Paint is not alcohol base jj.
Metho will react on shellac, nitro, some plastic, eg clear!
If metho made a reaction on the paint, its not the paint it reacted to , its the wax pollish .
If you really want it clean,
You can use prepsol from any auto shop, auto one ,super cheap auto etc
Prepsol is the wax grease remover you wipe between coats when spraying a car .


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 1:41:12 PM on 1 January 2018.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 320

Pete, If you use metho for example to clean the metal grill and logos on a typical 60’s transistor Radio, most times you will inadvertently remove the painted areas. Sorry but metho is not recommended for some jobs.
But of course the only thing to use in others.
BTW started work in a radio repair shop in 1965, and was playing with radios 5 years before that.
That makes approx 58 Years.
Metho on clock faces and for those that collect tobacco tins, will remove the paint.
I think that some paints of that age go “powdery”.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 2:25:09 PM on 1 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

We are refering to the underneath of a Garrard turntable.which is Enamel, Transistor radios are generally plastic, and you would never clean that with metho!
Badges are mostly water paint so you would not clean them with metho either. The grills are Acrylic paint too. If a paint is powder looking as you mentioned than that is oxidised and will fall off no matter what you used.
As I said early you can use Kero, I dont , kero will not hurt the paint as its oil base.
But even better is prepsol wax grease remover and it wont rot rubber.
People that restore turntables use all manner of things and in the UK and the states where most of this type of thing is done, Alcohol is a favourite.
Yes jj I know you have a history dating back to the 60s, I mentioned that you are experiencing TV repairs. I also go back a long way in finishes and restoration.
Btw if your ever worried about using metho on any item or paint etc, you just add a couple of drops of oil to the metho and it works as a buffer , it works well
Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 10:15:59 AM on 2 January 2018.
Zeerust's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 29 September 2016
 Member #: 1979
 Postcount: 48

Thanks for the replies. Heat did loosen the old grease. I'm now going to find some Singer Oil for the motor, and some Lithium grease from Bunnings for other parts. It seems these lubricants will do the job.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 11:56:22 AM on 3 January 2018.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 320

Pete, did you see the Astor 3in one that’s come up on eBay today.
I used to stand these up on one end to take the metal cover off bottom for servicing.
It’s a beauty but asking way too much.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 12:29:53 PM on 3 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

Hello Jj , Is it the same model as the one I sent you a link too that was in Hobart.
Plymouth?
I love those and I though I have lots of old tvs ,I dont have any Astors. JJ what chassis was in the Plymouth?
Was it good chassis?
Pop through crt ! I dont mind them.
Thanks jj , I will go look at ebay now.
Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 2:34:33 PM on 3 January 2018.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 320

I can’ remember exactly but all of this era Astor’s were good to work on, reliable and well engineered.
Good turntable and radio too.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 14 · Written at 1:01:49 PM on 5 January 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5262

I don't like WD-40. Myths abound about its multitude of applications (some truly miraculous) and the WD-40 Company allows that to happen because it sells the product.

If you look up the Australian MSDS you'll find:

Naphtha (petroleum), hydrodesulfurised heavy | CAS 64742-82-1 | >60%

... in other words more than 60% low aromatic white spirit, aka mineral turpentine.

A mate of mine repairs/restores electrical parts (clocks, gauges, you name it) in vintage and prestige vehicles. When mechanics bring him in problem parts the first thing he does is the sniff test. If he detects the telltale whiff of WD-40 he hands the part back.

I use a range of purpose-specific sprays and liquids in my workshop. The only thing with the brand WD-40 on it is silicone spray.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 15 · Written at 11:02:43 AM on 6 January 2018.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

Bloody silicon!
Dont even mention the word to me!
Rotton stuff its in everything!
Silicon causes major problems when painting cars or restoring furniture, paint , Shellacs and varnish, reacts badly to it and it leaves stains and marks that you cant sand out with out doing a full strip again.
For over 20 years I have been cursing the rotten stuff.
Normally when spraying a car or furniture, you add a few drops of U-poll to the paint or the varnish to stop silicon reactions or what we call fish eyes.
But we only add it if we suspect that a silcon soap or pollish has been used on the item.
As for WD 40, I dont use it much ,but its good for cleaning but you must remove the residue afterwards.
I was always told never use on locks ! Use Graphite!
Well WD is what all the lock smiths use now.
Pete

Silicon is not very popular in Hollywood these days !!!


 
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