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 Saba Electrosound
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 9:48:41 PM on 17 September 2013.
Feline's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 17 September 2013
 Member #: 1417
 Postcount: 9

Hi, I just got this TV. It is in good condition for age and a beautiful thing.

It is same one as this http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/search/simpleSearch.aspx?authority=topic&ID=58360.

Very disappointingly, it does not power up.
Any advise, please.

Felix


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 9:33:50 AM on 18 September 2013.
Nathan Brown's Gravatar
 Location: East Maitland, NSW
 Member since 13 May 2013
 Member #: 1342
 Postcount: 243

Blown fuse, or maybe faulty tubes


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"I'd rather have a CRT than nothing" - me
"people just throw working CRTs out, it is NOT FUNNY!" -me

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 9:49:35 AM on 18 September 2013.
Chris Ronayne's avatar
 Location: Wauchope, NSW
 Member since 1 January 2013
 Member #: 1269
 Postcount: 576

If I read the article correctly, and this television is in fact from 1956, then I'm not surprised. I cringe when someone says that they have plugged such an old set in, especially EBay sellers...

For a set of this age, you would most likely need to electrically restore the set. This would include replacing aged, faulty and off-value components, checking valves and the CRT, checking the transformers (which hopefully still work and haven't gone open or short circuit) and checking for any after-market modifications that may have been made to the circuit/chassis.

Unless you know what you are doing, I would recommend getting someone more experienced to restore the set for you.

Chris


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 2:58:44 PM on 18 September 2013.
Feline's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 17 September 2013
 Member #: 1417
 Postcount: 9

Well, I did not get this on ebay.
Chris you are correct, I do not know what I am doing.
That is why I have stopped and wrote to this forum. Who can I get to restore this unit?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 3:21:19 PM on 18 September 2013.
Nathan Brown's Gravatar
 Location: East Maitland, NSW
 Member since 13 May 2013
 Member #: 1342
 Postcount: 243

My mate Stephen knows how to restore valve TVs, though he knows very little about them, his phone number is 49631287, he is doing a resto on my 1966-67 HMV Trent TV


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"I'd rather have a CRT than nothing" - me
"people just throw working CRTs out, it is NOT FUNNY!" -me

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 6:29:02 PM on 18 September 2013.
Robert69's avatar
 Location: Western Victoria, VIC
 Member since 14 November 2009
 Member #: 579
 Postcount: 110

Hi Felix,

The advice so far is spot on - but before anything find someone who can test the picture tube.
Whenever considering restoring an early TV the first test -even before assessing the power supply and deflection circuits - is the picture tube! If the picture tube has an open filament or no emission then a restoration is pointless until you have found a good tube. If your potential restorer cannot test the tube, find another restorer.
I have one of these sets, and it also does not go - it has a blackened blown fuse, so a short somewhere. But I do know the picture tube is good and it will work oneday.

A great source of really useful information for TV restorers (in my opinion) can be found by looking at Youtube clips by bandersentv (Bob Anderson). I've subscribed to his channel and eagerly await new uploads - I think my interest in restoring TVs (rather than radios) has been rekindled by watching his work. Check it out if you have a chance?

Robert


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Robert

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 6:38:08 PM on 18 September 2013.
Robert69's avatar
 Location: Western Victoria, VIC
 Member since 14 November 2009
 Member #: 579
 Postcount: 110

Felix,
I also wanted to ask - how much do you want to spend to restore the set? Or do you want to just make it work and accept that it might not be reliable without a full restoration? To pay someone to properly restore an old television might be very expensive. A basic full capacitor replacement (without extensive fault finding or other major component failures) could easily be $200 - 300 unless you could find someone who just wants to do it for fun and will only charge parts cost, but I don't know anyone personally - maybe others here do?


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Robert

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 8:50:51 PM on 18 September 2013.
Feline's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 17 September 2013
 Member #: 1417
 Postcount: 9

If there was snow on the screen and I could hear static from the speaker, that would be a start...


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 10:19:18 PM on 18 September 2013.
Sue's avatar
 Sue
 Location: Daylesford, VIC
 Member since 13 January 2011
 Member #: 809
 Postcount: 311

If there's no picture, and no sound at all, not even a hiss or a crackle when the volume control is turned, it suggests that the power supply isn't working. That's a fairly simple kind of fault to fix. As for the picture tube, if the "getter" on the inside of the neck is still silver, and the filament still conducts, the tube is probably capable of producing a picture and the set is worth working on.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 11:10:21 PM on 18 September 2013.
Robert69's avatar
 Location: Western Victoria, VIC
 Member since 14 November 2009
 Member #: 579
 Postcount: 110

Well I don't know about that Sue. The emission from an old picture tube will be the determing factor in the quality of the picture - assuming intact filament and still under vacuum. What I'm referring to above is that prior to engaging in a full (and costly) restoration one needs to be assured of the emission of the tube. I once totally rebuilt a 1956 Phillips 17 TT and it showed a very weak picture that eventually faded to zero over 1 week of soak testing - and then I tested emission to find none! So a good rule of thumb is "always check the picture tube first" and as others above have said - DON'T JUST TURN THEM ON!


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Robert

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 11:45:35 PM on 18 September 2013.
Chris Ronayne's avatar
 Location: Wauchope, NSW
 Member since 1 January 2013
 Member #: 1269
 Postcount: 576

Another thing I'd like to expand on is to check that the CRT still holds a secure vacuum. I'm not so sure about Aussie CRTs, but I've heard that a lot of earlier American tubes would gradually go to air (lose their vacuum), which in turn renders them useless.

As Sue said, look for a small silvery getter deposit/coating on the inside of the neck of the CRT. If it's still there, then there should be a vacuum present. If it's turned a white or light grey shade, then you have a major problem on your hands - as this indicates that the tube has gone to air.

EDIT: I also overlooked mentioning a check on the mains power lead. I don't know how prone a 57 year old lead would be, but it would be best to replace it. Some of the power leads in vintage equipment/appliances can deteriorate with age, which can in turn overheat, short out or shock you.

I'd recommend, if possible, replacing the two-core mains lead with a modern 3-core (grounded) mains lead. It's better to be safe then sorry.

I wish you the best of luck in getting this television going.

Chris


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 9:45:29 AM on 19 September 2013.
MonochromeTV's avatar
 Location: Melbourne, VIC
 Member since 20 September 2011
 Member #: 1009
 Postcount: 1140

I've just checked the circuits for the Electrosound - Saba models T544, 705, 805 & S1005. I really don't think it'd be a good idea to use a earthed 3 core mains lead. All these Saba models, like a lot of exotic European TV's, use series heated valves, which indicate a transformerless live chassis. So anyone working on this set will have to be extra careful and know just exactly what they are doing.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 11:07:37 AM on 9 October 2013.
Feline's Gravatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 17 September 2013
 Member #: 1417
 Postcount: 9

Update,
I found someone who is keen to fix this TV. So we are looking for circuit diagram. The model is Electrosound SABA E544. I found a comment on magnetofon.de forum that the chassis is identical to the other Saba Schauinsland
Devices of the 1955 / 56th .
Monochrome 625, maybe I can ask you to point to or email me the schematics you refer to.

Thank you,
Felix


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 14 · Written at 2:23:15 PM on 9 October 2013.
MonochromeTV's avatar
 Location: Melbourne, VIC
 Member since 20 September 2011
 Member #: 1009
 Postcount: 1140

Hi Felix.

I have a circuit diagram for a Electrosound Saba T544. I'm guessing it would be the same as a E544 or similar. I think the E & the T in the model numbers signify cabinet styles. If interested, please go to my profile where you'll find my email details.

Cheers.


 
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