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 Aust B&W TVs that had True Black Level?
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 16 · Written at 4:42:03 PM on 2 March 2018.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 351

Yes, I can well remember when the Japanese imports started coming into Tasmania.
Those used to the Philips K9’s ect , “natural colour” were not all that happy with the colour rendition, but were blown away with the reliability. Although Philips and Kriesler were fairly good in all regards.
I notice that modern flat screens are all leaning towards very bright colours, but far easier for the viewers to tone it down.
We have lived in a fantastic period, crystal sets and candles to 4K and beyond large flat screens.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 17 · Written at 12:44:11 PM on 12 March 2018.
Irext's avatar
 Location: Werribee South, VIC
 Member since 30 September 2016
 Member #: 1981
 Postcount: 268

The company I worked for as an Apprentice Radio Tradesman in the mid seventies sold the HMV/Healing C211 models and the Rank Arena C2201 and C2601 models.

The HMV/Healing models used the Philips delta gun tubes and when working (they were dreadfully unreliable) produced much more accurate colours the the Rank Arena sets.

Customers rarely noticed the difference and were drawn to the Rank sets as they were infinitely more reliable.

Many of the HMV/Healing sets were dead out of the box requiring repairs before they could be delivered but once working and correctly set up produced a far nicer picture than the Rank Arena sets.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 18 · Written at 1:03:19 PM on 12 March 2018.
Johnny's avatar
 Location: Hobart, TAS
 Member since 31 July 2016
 Member #: 1959
 Postcount: 351

I can remember unpacking 25 new c211’s for Rental stock and 8 were DOA.
Five actually blew up with loud scary noises and smoke.
Ah! They were the days.
We quickly learnt to use series globes and variacs to power up rebuilt power supplies.
The whole concept of the chassis was very good though, and after about a year or so had been sorted out very well.
Then they took the chassis off the market.
AWA has similar problems at that time.
JJ


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 19 · Written at 2:50:46 PM on 12 March 2018.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1490

" The whole concept of the chassis was very good though, and after about a year or so had been sorted out very well. "

Ah, wasn't that just typical HMV?

AWA started with a UK Thorn design that was deeply flawed from the start and locked them into parts they had to import from the UK..

Pye did so much better. They looked initially at what Pye UK were doing and quickly and very wisely ignored it! Designed their own from the ground up, or, not quite from the ground up since by that time they had been making SS B&W TVs for many years. They took the best from Euro, Japanese and their own designs and kept it simple. Far and away the most successful Australian early colour sets.

Those who remember these sets might recall that there were two hinge-out PCBs and the power supply, hor OP transformer etc. were on a metal base chassis with point-to-point wiring on tagstrips. This was basically a prototype design but they ran out of time and had to go into production with it the way it was! The later T34 showed what they had planned to do with what became the T29.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 20 · Written at 9:57:07 AM on 21 March 2018.
Robbbert's avatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 18 September 2015
 Member #: 1801
 Postcount: 1178

I was reading an English television servicing magazine called "Television", and someone related how in the old days, most new TVs had to be repaired before they could be put on sale. How things have changed.

As for "Television" magazine, it seems to have completely disappeared without a trace.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 21 · Written at 6:32:01 PM on 31 March 2018.
Labrat's avatar
 Location: Penrith, NSW
 Member since 7 April 2012
 Member #: 1128
 Postcount: 278

Hi Robbert.

The British magazine "Television," first appeared in January 1932 and ceased in 2008.
It changed name several times over the years much like the name changes with RTV&H, Electronics Australia.
The most recent edition of Television that I can find is April 2001.

I have around sixteen volumes of Television at home, and have 15 or 16 editions from 1989 and 1995 which you may have.
As I read the others, you may have them also, if you wish.

I bought Silicon Chip, Electronics Australia, Talking Electronics, Electronics Today International, and Television for years until the expense of it all became too much.

Wayne.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 22 · Written at 1:19:16 AM on 4 April 2018.
Robbbert's avatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 18 September 2015
 Member #: 1801
 Postcount: 1178

I used to have many years worth of "Television", but most of them went out in a cleanup. There's still a few though.

Now that I know they died, I won't look any further.

When you've finished reading them all, let me know and I'll drive up there and collect them. Thanks for the offer! Smile


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 23 · Written at 9:41:04 PM on 21 February 2019.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 653

"As for "Television" magazine, it seems to have completely disappeared without a trace."

Did that used to be called Practical Television? I have 1957 & 1958 editions available:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Practical-Television-magazines-UK-all-1957-1958-issues-in-Publishers-binders-/283369159313


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 24 · Written at 4:56:23 AM on 22 February 2019.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5514

From the Wiki:

QUOTE: Practical Television, later known as Television and subsequently Television & Consumer Electronics, was a UK magazine for the electronics/TV servicing trade, enthusiasts, and the general public.

Practical Television was initially a supplement to Practical Wireless and available as a separate publication from September 1934. The first issue after the war was No. 1 in April 1950. The chief editor was F.J. Camm and it was published by George Newnes. It was closed in June 2008.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 25 · Written at 7:23:27 AM on 22 February 2019.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 653

The BBC camera on the August 1957 cover looks like a Marconi mk-III (a camera that weighs more than the cameramanSmoke)
https://www.tvcameramuseum.org/marconi/mk3/mk3-1.htm


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 26 · Written at 9:18:15 AM on 9 March 2019.
Irext's avatar
 Location: Werribee South, VIC
 Member since 30 September 2016
 Member #: 1981
 Postcount: 268

As I recall the Serviceman section in the Television Mag was written by Les Laurie Johns and was hilarious to read.
He had a very laconic style and used to tell customers to "Sod off" regularly. (I wish I could have done that).
I wish I had some to re read now. I'd go to that section 1st when I bought an issue.


 
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