Welcome to Australia's only Vintage Radio and Television discussion forums. You are not logged in. Please log in below, apply for an account or retrieve your password.
Australian Vintage Radio Forums
  Home  ·  About Us  ·  Discussion Forums  ·  Glossary  ·  Outside Links  ·  Policies  ·  Services Directory  ·  Safety Warnings  ·  Tutorials

Member Introductions

Forum home - Go back to Member Introductions

 Hello from a new member in country Victoria, Aust
« Back · 1 · Next »
 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 9:01:42 PM on 21 June 2016.
Yvonne's Gravatar
 Location: Tatura, VIC
 Member since 21 June 2016
 Member #: 1943
 Postcount: 6

I am very belatedly (its taken 64 years) getting myself into vintage radiograms, so new that I'm not even sure of the difference yet between stereogram, gramaphone and phonogram! I recently purchased a 1960s GE radiogram(?) in absolutely superb condition from a clearing sale. At the time I had no idea if it worked and really didnt mind if it didnt - it was just such a gorgeous piece of furniture. BUT when I got home and bought a few 78s and played them - yes it worked beautifully - the sound quality blew my mind. Anyway long story short I'm now well and truly hooked. I very reluctantly passed the GE over to my daughter, the reason id bought it in the first place. That was several months ago and I admit to feeling quite lost when I wanted to play some good music - the ipad just wasnt cutting it. So I started looking around and yesterday was lucky enough to purchase a 1962 Philips 228 radiogram. It works - basically - but I want to know more about it and improve its workability and sound. I am absolutely ignorant about the workings but keen to learn - hence my googling has brought me to this forum. Great job in setting it up Brad! I dont know where to start with my various issues but will try to prioritise and post something soon. Hoping to chat to those more knowledgable than me in the process.
Yvonne
Ps. Is it possible to include photos on this forum.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 9:22:57 PM on 21 June 2016.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5262

Welcome to the forum.

In a nutshell: a stereogram is a record player that can properly play records recorded by the stereophonic process, that is they have left and right channels, as opposed to mono (or monaural) records which have only one channel recorded. Stereo equipment needs an amplifier for each channel as well as at least one speaker for each channel, whereas mono requires only one.

Phonograph tends to be used in relation to the original wind-up record players with cylindrical records, and gramophone was the name of a competitor's machine. These days gramophone is more widely used I'd say to describe the old wind-up style of player.

Wiki says: "The phonograph is a device invented in 1877 for the mechanical recording and reproduction of sound. In its later forms it is also called a gramophone (as a trademark since 1887, as a generic name since c. 1900)"

At present, photos are inserted by Brad (See note 6 above the message posting box." If you want photos published with your post then please click here for instructions.")

However, we are hopeful that in the very near future there will be the ability to upload images ourselves directly.

If you want to ask questions about particular models, suggest you create new topics by model in the Tech Talk section, with brand and model in the title.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 10:07:13 PM on 21 June 2016.
Yvonne's Gravatar
 Location: Tatura, VIC
 Member since 21 June 2016
 Member #: 1943
 Postcount: 6

Thanks GTC very informative. I will log my queries with a Tech post as youve suggested and will read Note 6.
Can I trouble you with a bit more of an explanation too? I understand the phonograph and gramophone now but the stereo vs radiogram is still not clear. What do you mean by left and right channels? are these channels visible on the records themselves or the unit? See I really am a novice! I have two speakers on my Philips and I'm guessing speakers are the same thing as amplifiers??? Also will mono records play on stereo and vice versa and how can I tell by looking at a record whether its mono or stereo?

Cheers
Yvonne


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 1:31:08 AM on 22 June 2016.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5262

stereo vs radiogram is still not clear

Radiogram is the name used to describe a combination of radio and gramophone in the one unit. Such units will typically have a mode switch with positions labelled RADIO and GRAM, or similar. That is, you can use either the radio or the gramophone at a time, but not both simultaneously.

What do you mean by left and right channels? are these channels visible on the records themselves or the unit?

Stereophonic recording aims to reproduce sound the same way as we hear it. We have two ears, so we can discern a sound source as being mainly to our left, or our right, or from ahead/behind. The simplest stereo recording uses two microphones: one pointed to the left of (say) an orchestra and the other pointed to its right. This is best described by demonstration. (Listen with headphones for best effect.)

Here is the very first stereo sound recording from 1934:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0qzIZaiPFs

and here is a pretty comprehensive explanation of the process from 1958:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqEeP6YPkGM

I'm guessing speakers are the same thing as amplifiers?

Not in the sense we are using those words here. The 1958 clip above shows the sound path.

will mono records play on stereo

Yes

and vice versa

Yes, but the benefit of the usually carefully recorded stereo effect is lost and they may sound pretty awful by comparison.

and how can I tell by looking at a record whether its mono or stereo?

Usually by the label. Very old 78 rpm records are mono by default, but once stereo became popular the labels indicated stereo.

Note that the old 78rpm records are made of Bakelite which is quite abrasive and requires the appropriate type of stylus (needle). The modern vinyl records (which are played at either 45 or 33 1/3 rpm) are not so abrasive and use a different type of stylus. Some old radiograms have a turn-over type cartridge that contains one of each type of stylus.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 11:17:08 AM on 22 June 2016.
Yvonne's Gravatar
 Location: Tatura, VIC
 Member since 21 June 2016
 Member #: 1943
 Postcount: 6

Wow, thanks for that response GTC, I can now understand that I have a radio/ gramophone and getting my head around the stereo (thnk headphones) concept. From your explanation ive determined my old 78s are all monos because none of the 70 odd records I purchased from the previous owner indicate stereo. My stylus I'm thinking may be appropriate however will look into that further. And the arm does have an LP/78s flip switch. Now that I'm understanding a little bit, am very grateful for your patience too by the way, I will post a few of my queries in Tech Talk.
Cheers
Yvonne


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 9:59:08 PM on 22 June 2016.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 3706

Be careful, of that "flip switch": In a lot of the BSR & later turntable / record changers the stylus flipped. In some Like the local Radio clubs HMV R53B (mono) the whole cartridge rotates (two separate styli) It has a bad habit of breaking the wires off.

The original changer in it is as far as far as I am concerned a mechanised abomination. Currently I have a BSR in it while we see if we can fix the other horror.

Marc


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 4:40:57 PM on 26 June 2016.
Gfr53's Gravatar
 Location: Harston, VIC
 Member since 28 February 2009
 Member #: 442
 Postcount: 145

Hi Yvonne,

Send me an email so I can get your email address. I am quite close to Tat and may be able to answer your questions face to face or via the phone.

If you point and click on the Gfr53 at the top left of this message, you will find my email address.

Cheers, Graham...


 
« Back · 1 · Next »
 You need to be a member to post comments on this forum.

Sign In

Username:
Password:
 Keep me logged in.
Do not tick box on a computer with public access.