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 The end of AM radio broadcasting?
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 4:50:01 PM on 25 September 2017.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1345

Have a good read of this.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Radio_Mondiale

It looks very interesting and addresses the need for radio services in isolated areas, where the ABC has shut down their HF transmitters.

But it does mean our valve radios are going to be unable to be used - eventually. Just like analogue TVs.

The writing is on the wall.....


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 5:28:55 PM on 25 September 2017.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 1445

Just plug them into the valve radios.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 5:49:46 PM on 25 September 2017.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5341

See this thread re September issue of Silicon Chip:

https://vintage-radio.com.au/default.asp?f=1&th=1124#10419


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 5:59:29 PM on 25 September 2017.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 1445

This does seem to be the only alternative. I do hope the old am gear stays around at least another decade but alas I think it will mean more of our beautiful old sets put in the not interested bucket . I will be using mine the best way I can.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 6:23:04 PM on 26 September 2017.
Simplex's Gravatar
 Location: Bathurst, NSW
 Member since 7 August 2008
 Member #: 336
 Postcount: 297

How could a move to DRM be economically justified. Apart from rendering obsolete literally millions of privately owned radios the expense in new transmitters would be horrendous.

As well there is so much online digital radio I do not see a complete scrapping and rebuilding of the AM radio network a realistic proposal.

The ABC crowd shriek at everyone to listen to them using their mobile phones with an app and now this DRM is being touted about.

If nothing else, 20 years to late.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 8:27:43 PM on 26 September 2017.
BringBackTheValve's Gravatar
 Location: Linton, VIC
 Member since 30 December 2016
 Member #: 2028
 Postcount: 229

Yet another source of randomly sprayed EMR noise.

Marvellous! (NOT)


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 11:04:42 AM on 27 September 2017.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1345

Actually, I think the economics might be its downfall, although:

1. Most existing transmitters can be used, including the ABC SW ones that were recently shut down.
2. It can co-exist with analogue.
3. Signal is in-band - it will not interfere with adjacent services any more than analogue does and requires less Tx power than analogue for the same coverage.

Noise free long distance radio that will cover areas outside the reach of other technologies is an attractive idea.

I was skeptical at first but it does look interesting when you read more about it.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 2:39:36 PM on 27 September 2017.
Wa2ise's avatar
 Location: Oradell, US
 Member since 2 April 2010
 Member #: 643
 Postcount: 730

In the USA we have in band on channel (IBOC) digital radio broadcasts on AM and on FM. There's less AM IBOC signals than there were five to ten years ago. An AM station with IBOC has hash noise 5 to 10kHz away from the station's AM carrier. Few people have bought digital receivers, though.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 3:32:06 PM on 27 September 2017.
Simplex's Gravatar
 Location: Bathurst, NSW
 Member since 7 August 2008
 Member #: 336
 Postcount: 297

Given Australia's low population except for the major cities and the great distances for the rest of the scattered population centres do not see it as a viable proposition.

AM stereo died long ago and think that the owners of radio networks particulary those in regional areas are pretty content with the status quo as it is.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 10:05:20 PM on 27 September 2017.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 615

There's less AM IBOC signals than there were five to ten years ago.

That's alarming! Going the way of AM Stereo?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 3:16:53 PM on 1 January 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5341

QUOTE:

Old cars saving radio, but it's ‘next in line’ for disruption

Radio businesses have not been hit as hard by digital disruption as traditional print and television for a simple reason - the cars Australians drive are old.

The average registered vehicle in the country was made more than a decade ago, and this has made it difficult for radio listeners to switch to new digital formats, Citi analyst David Kaynes says.

While consumers can stop buying newspapers and switch to online formats, and televisions and accessories are regularly upgraded, people are slower to buy new cars.

The average age of all motor vehicles registered in Australia was 10.1 years in January 2017, a figure that has remained stable for years, according to Australian Bureau of Statistics data.

For passenger vehicles - 75 per cent of all vehicles on the road - it was 9.8 years.

This means the average motor vehicle nationally is a 2007 model, built in the same year the first iPhone was released. More than a third of passenger vehicles were built before this.

Drivers in older cars "cannot access digital radio, or connect a smartphone to play alternative audio through the car’s stereo", Mr Kaynes said in a research note.

About 70 per cent of weekday revenue for metro radio stations is generated from the breakfast and drive slots.

--- SMH


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 10:37:18 PM on 11 February 2018.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 505

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 12:49:07 PM on 21 March 2018.
NewVista's avatar
 Location: MilwWI, US
 Member since 10 May 2013
 Member #: 1340
 Postcount: 615

"There's less AM IBOC signals than there were five to ten years ago."

And yet AM-Stereo is making a comeback!
This site gives updates: http://meduci.com/stations.html
It says 4BC Brisbane is rejiggering for stereo revival.
I see there are half a dozen around me so will be installing my Clarion AM-st radio in my 1991 Lumina for listening when touring.

Why do AM stereo radios have have that AM-st button (Clarion, Delco...)? For wideband mode? Was it before good auto-mode circuitry?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 14 · Written at 4:27:15 PM on 21 March 2018.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1345

"Why do AM stereo radios have have that AM-st button ....?"

Have you ever tried to use AM stereo under anything less than perfect reception conditions? If you had, you'd know why.

I suppose it could be automated but the jumping in and out of wideband stereo mode as you drive along would be most distracting. I used to have a car with AM stereo and most of the time I turned it off, it was just too annoying.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 15 · Written at 4:46:15 PM on 21 March 2018.
STC830's Gravatar
 Location: NSW
 Member since 10 June 2010
 Member #: 681
 Postcount: 843

"Why do AM stereo radios have have that AM-st button ....?"

I concur with Ian's opinion here. I still have one of these Clarion radios, though it hasn't been used for probably 30 years, and it would "pop" out of stereo at the drop of a hat even if the signal was strong.

Will see if I can track down the owners manual to see the function of the various buttons.


 
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