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 Reception attenuated by trees.
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 4:42:10 PM on 24 April 2017.
Labrat's avatar
 Location: Penrith, NSW
 Member since 7 April 2012
 Member #: 1128
 Postcount: 272

I saw this and wondered what would happen to their signal strength.

Tree Antenna


Wayne.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 1:05:58 PM on 25 April 2017.
Fred Lever's Gravatar
 Location: Toongabbie, NSW
 Member since 19 November 2015
 Member #: 1828
 Postcount: 605

The signal strength should be ok but probably the colour balance may need adjusting in the set to reduce the green!
Sorry, could not help myself!
Fred.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 1:40:11 PM on 25 April 2017.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 1445

The picture might get a bit hazy in winter time as well lol.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 1:49:33 PM on 25 April 2017.
Simplex's Gravatar
 Location: Bathurst, NSW
 Member since 7 August 2008
 Member #: 336
 Postcount: 297

Might be ok in dry warm weather but when in rain there may be greater absorption to the signal.

Depends how strong the incoming signal is in the first place I guess.

Looks pretty if nothing else.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 2:33:14 PM on 25 April 2017.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5340

Looks pretty if nothing else.

That's Morning Glory, a noxious weed if ever there was one! I've seen it take over entire areas, but that's the first time I've seen it on a TV antenna.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 8:05:41 PM on 27 April 2017.
Irext's avatar
 Location: Werribee South, VIC
 Member since 30 September 2016
 Member #: 1981
 Postcount: 211

Looks like it might be the only thing holding the chimney together. I remember as an apprentice fitting a chimney mount and wondering why I kept running out of tension adjustment till I found out I was collapsing the chimney!!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 5:09:48 PM on 28 April 2017.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5620

It's too easy to knock over a chimney. Cement and concrete are good load bearers in compression but in tension there's no strength at all.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 9:42:17 AM on 29 April 2017.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 3856

I cannot see how that pole is anchored? But with the height of that pole, I would suggest that the wind loading on both it and the tendency to rock (ie."tick tock" & sway in the gusting wind) are all going to conspire to either damage the chimney, or see the the pole bend.

Even when we had chimney's I would not use them. I am in a rural location & the wind has greater effect as there is less to restrict it. The other issue with chimneys are the products that come out of them and you often need a similar height clearance as you need for the chimney / flue above a roof.

Often rural antennas cannot be mounted high and this is one of my beef's with many seemingly untrained installers. NBN seems to have a lot of them & that point was raised at a recent Senate inquiry. I have seen several examples, due to their unbending requirement that the antenna receiver antenna has to be on their approved fitting on a roof.

Of course we who have a basic, or more understanding of radio wave propagation realise that a clear line of sight to the transmitter is the most desirable. So when NBN gets no signal there is months of delay whilst someone in a place like Mumbai who only knows the terrain from Google earth takes months to come up with some sort of approval to put it elsewhere: Another complaint raised.

Several TV antenna's around here are on poles & I have some and more than one set of antenna's locally is less than 3m from the ground & several metres away from buildings & obstructions, in order to get a decent signal strength., or even get into the signal path.

Marc


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 5:00:23 PM on 29 April 2017.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5620

My guess is that the mast has two saddles anchored to the chimney with cedar or lead rawlplugs and that's about it. Some of the chimney is already missing. Normally they have a 'tunnel' at the top to create the suction that draws the smoke out and they are usually capped off with 'soldiers' - bricks laid on end or their narrow sides.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 5:08:11 PM on 30 April 2017.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 3856

That is far from a new house. One of the issues of chimneys is "Concrete cancer" and I have also seen poorly fired bricks turning to powder.

What normally happens if the mortar fails sufficiently and leaves a hole, it can allow sparks to ignite the house. Many houses like that never have the ceiling space checked & are often lined with sparrow nests, which burn well.

Marc


 
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