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 AWAmodel 563ma Clock module
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 3:45:24 PM on 31 October 2023.
Bowler's Gravatar
 Location: Bongaree, QLD
 Member since 26 October 2018
 Member #: 2308
 Postcount: 81

Hi All, has anyone got a fix for these clock modules? The one I have has the motor running ok, but it struggles to turn the hands consistently. Hope someone can help. PS the same clock module is used on several models of AWA radios. bowler


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 4:07:22 PM on 31 October 2023.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Naremburn, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 7342

Shaded pole motors aren't known for much torque and in a clock mechanism even a stray grain of sand or grit will stall the mechanism. Even a human hair tangled in the works will create issues. The movement will need careful cleaning and lubricating at the very least, making sure none of the bushes are binding on anything. Also check the gears to make sure they are perpendicular to their shafts and aren't bent. Make sure that any gears which are made of nylon or fibre have all their teeth. Worn teeth means a replacement will be necessary.

I am sure that AWA's choice of movement was Smiths and they are normally very reliable but it all comes down to whether the original lube has dried out or if the radio it is housed in has had a hard life.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 11:43:20 PM on 31 October 2023.
Robbbert's avatar
 Location: Hill Top, NSW
 Member since 18 September 2015
 Member #: 1801
 Postcount: 2039

In all the clock modules I've encountered, every single one has died, except for one in a Philips radio.

Take note that the radium on the hands is still radioactive even if it doesn't glow any more.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 4:58:45 AM on 1 November 2023.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Naremburn, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 7342

On average I've had more trouble with missing knobs than the clocks themselves, though they are like anything else I suppose. The last clock radio made by AWA would be getting on for 60 years old now.


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A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 12:25:14 PM on 1 November 2023.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 5303

I would support the lubricant idea, it is a well known fact that with the effluxion of time the older grease soaps solidify. Mixing different greases can precipitate the issue, to the point that CASA did put a directive out on it some time ago.

In the case of wheel bearings I have had more than one trailer, and vehicle turn up here minus a wheel, due to a catastrophic bearing failure. Last one on an RACV Truck: Grease and overloading. People seem to not realise that any grease in a bearing, like a trailer, will contain "fretted" metal from wearing bearings. You remove all traces of grease and replace with an appropriate wheel bearing grease.

Take that on board before taking the caravan out on a holiday.

Turntables are also susceptible to this grease issue, as are many other things.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 8:49:38 PM on 1 November 2023.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 2405

I used to fix clocks when I was a kid. I have more recently done a Smiths electric clock in an AWA radio.

You will need to strip the gear train down, wash all the parts in white spirit to remove ALL the old oil, use a toothpick to clean out the bearing holes, reassemble and lubricate with "sewing machine oil" or similar very light oil.

Fiddly to do (take lots of pictures!) but it's the only way.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 11:58:05 AM on 2 November 2023.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 2161

Hi Bowler
I actually have a New Old Stock one that you can have if you email me. Just cost of postage will do.

Carl


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 9:55:41 PM on 2 November 2023.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 6720

I actually have a New Old Stock one

A NOS clock of that type would be considered unobtainium. Where did you find that?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 7:18:03 AM on 3 November 2023.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 2161

GTC I actually bought it from Brian Lackie a few years ago. It's still sitting in my spare parts bin.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 8:54:31 AM on 3 November 2023.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 5303

Some where here there is a salvaged AWA clock. IT would with out doubt need servicing.

The question with them is like the speedo of the MKII Zephyr and many turntables. It started to make interesting noises & get the wobbles. The question then became do I modular service or service it? Of course being of the same age the other one was liable to be the same & the grease soap had also failed.

So it got dismantled, serviced and is still working as it should.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 6:47:00 PM on 3 November 2023.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 2405

A NOS one might well have the same issue, it's the oil that goes hard with time (in a clock lol)


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 9:13:01 PM on 3 November 2023.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 5303

Which reminds me that the 1903 kitchen clock, needs oiling. Not a five minute job


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 1:01:20 PM on 5 November 2023.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 2161

Clock is posted.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 14 · Written at 6:52:15 PM on 6 November 2023.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 2405

Fixing clocks was good practice for rebuilding car gearboxes!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 15 · Written at 8:07:27 PM on 6 November 2023.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 5303

True both take time. Tractor ones can be entertaining; especially when you need to break it into three to get at it all.


 
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