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 Vintage code practice oscillator
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 10:17:11 AM on 31 October 2014.
Wa2ise's avatar
 Location: Oradell, US
 Member since 2 April 2010
 Member #: 643
 Postcount: 725


My father WB2JIA (silent key) used this to practice code, along with a paper tape machine that played tape with long or short holes cut into it, for the dahs and dits.

This oscillator was a "hot chassis" design. Yes, the screw terminals connected directly to the powerline! One of the tubes was a rectifier, the other the oscillator.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 9:41:53 PM on 31 October 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Cool Smile I'm making the single tube oscillator straight out of the 1951 ARRL handbook (page 15).
It wants 22.5 Volts, and 1.5 Volts DC which my supply can provide.
I have a vintage "beginners key" but am getting a serious one in the next couple of weeks.
VK4FAST.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 9:44:28 PM on 31 October 2014.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5510

I've never seen a four letter callsign before. What class of licence is that for?


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 10:12:10 PM on 31 October 2014.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5262

What class of licence is that for?

http://www.wia.org.au/licenses/foundation/about/.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 10:37:43 PM on 31 October 2014.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5510

Looks like they are just about out of available two letter callsigns and have made four letter ones available. They reckon in the eastern states one has to go into a ballot for a two letter callsign now (for those that qualify for one).

I guess the removal of the requirement to be proficient at Morse Code has encouraged more and more to apply for licences.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 11:19:36 PM on 31 October 2014.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5262

I guess the removal of the requirement to be proficient at Morse Code has encouraged more and more to apply for licences.

A foundation class licence is not particularly difficult to obtain. Its introduction was part of a move by the WIA to rebuild interest in amateur radio among young people in particular.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 10:15:52 PM on 1 November 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Yes there are plenty of 3 letter suffixes, but someone has to be lost to get their two letter in Aus.
If a family member's call becomes available, family members are supposed to have a year to claim it before it goes back in the pool.

Morse is completely abandoned from all three levels of testing other than having to know what Morse is, and what segments are allocated for it.
Funny enough this has resulted in a massive resurgence!

I'm due to sit the standard test in November.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 9:13:38 PM on 2 November 2014.
Baz F's Gravatar
 Location: Calista, WA
 Member since 1 April 2014
 Member #: 1540
 Postcount: 81

I got my first amateur radio licence in 1965 when you had to pass a City and Guilds exam.
No multiple choice, question might be for example:

Design, and explain the operation of, a CW/MCW transmitter capable of operation in the 80metre band, and explain how spurious transmissions may be avoided. (time allowed 1 1/2 hours)

or: In 500 words explain the operation of the ....(would be a cct diagram of some piece of RX/Tx equipment) (time allowed 1/2 hour)

Probably about 12 - 15 questions, including licence conditions, regulations, antennae design, plenty of maths questions (dc and ac theory), valve and transistor theory and so on.

Follow that with 12 wpm morse test conducted by inspectors from HM Customs.

Lucky for me I was doing a 9 month radio technician course in Royal Signals at the same time.

You felt you had earned an amateur licence in those days!


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
Baz

VK6MU


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 9:42:51 PM on 2 November 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

I'd take on your first example with modern components, and VK4FAST was a pre-commitment to Morse ;)
I must admit I've been slack, but my practice key is difficult to use.. not to long to wait for the proper one now though.

I picked this puppy up yesterday from 1984. The aim was to get one of the first digital rigs.
It's a cracker the way they tried to simulate an analogue dial on the lower VFD there.. I love it Grin
My current key is just in the shot there.

Image Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv4Lz3IZIHs.


 
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