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Cabinet Repairs

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 Repairing 1956 Astor SJ cabinet
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 9:52:43 AM on 21 October 2013.
Chris Ronayne's avatar
 Location: Wauchope, NSW
 Member since 1 January 2013
 Member #: 1269
 Postcount: 576

Hi all,

I have an old 1956 Astoe SJ tabletop television I am restoring, and while I am without a step-down transformer for my Sencore CRT tester, I may as well start the cabinet restoration.

My main question is about restoring the cabinet itself. The timber is in decent condition, though needs to be refinished. The original finish has cracked into little pieces, that you can pretty much brush off with your hand. What would be the recommended procedure for restoring the cabinet to it's former glory.

The set uses a glass panel in front of the CRT, as a form of protection against CRT inplosion I suppose? It has a faint blue/purple tint to it, but is regrettably damaged. Are there glass laminates or something available that are of a similar colour?

Lastly, the set is missing the plastic speaker/control grille on the front, which unfortunately detracts from the appearance majorly. Does anyone have a spare, or know where I can obtain one?

Thanks,

Chris


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 1:24:23 AM on 22 October 2013.
Nathan Brown's Gravatar
 Location: East Maitland, NSW
 Member since 13 May 2013
 Member #: 1342
 Postcount: 243

The best way I have used to restore woodgrain TV cabinets is to stain it with wood stain Smile


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
"I'd rather have a CRT than nothing" - me
"people just throw working CRTs out, it is NOT FUNNY!" -me

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 11:37:24 AM on 22 October 2013.
Chris Ronayne's avatar
 Location: Wauchope, NSW
 Member since 1 January 2013
 Member #: 1269
 Postcount: 576

Have you restored any sets yourself though Nathan? I thought your friend Steve did all your restorations?

There are many finishes available, in an even wider array of colours/hues. I don't imagine the cabinet would need any extra work (sanding down etc.) prior to finishing it, aside from stripping the existing lacquer.

Chris


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 12:47:46 PM on 22 October 2013.
Redxm's avatar
 Location: Tamworth, NSW
 Member since 6 April 2012
 Member #: 1126
 Postcount: 436


Chris

Is the timber, raw timber or veneer.

If its veneer you really dont want to go too hard on the sanding.

Paint strip the cabinet. leave the stripper on only enough to do the job. rinse off and then give it a good coat of vinegar to neutralise the stripper.

If there are repairs required, then do them now.

Couple of options here, you can rub the cabinet with grain filler, this will give a really nice finish. rub it in with a rag, just enough to do the job. a run over with very fine steel wool (size 0000 - not the stuff from coles!) will finish it off. If you are happy with the grain pattern you can skip this step.

Ideally, spray the lacquer on, let dry between coats and a quick rub with more steel wool.

Pick a finish appropriate to the age of the tv. Super shiney gloss enamal usually doesnt look right. It may on a telly, but not on a radio. I leave that to your discretion.

I use nitro-cellulose laquer on my radio cabinets, as this is what generally was used in the 1920s - 1940s.

Its hard to source in hardware shops, but can be purchased at paint wholesalers.


Ben


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 12:01:56 AM on 18 December 2013.
Ngsafety's Gravatar
 Banned User
 Location: Dee Why, NSW
 Member since 17 December 2013
 Member #: 1467
 Postcount: 3

There are many solutions. I think better you can contact a person who repair successfully your cabinet.

[URL REMOVED]


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 12:04:56 AM on 18 December 2013.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 5342

Counting down the banning of spammer ngsaftey ... 5...4...3..


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 6:20:42 AM on 18 December 2013.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5627

Yeah, it's all too easy to predict, isn't it. Approve

What test/tag has to do with cabinet restoration will probably remain one of life's mysteries.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 1:58:28 PM on 18 December 2013.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Before the sandpaper, see what you can pull off with duct tape Smile


 
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