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 Paint stripper on bakelite
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 12:44:26 PM on 22 October 2015.
Redxm's avatar
 Location: Tamworth, NSW
 Member since 6 April 2012
 Member #: 1126
 Postcount: 435

Hi
Has anyone used paint stripper on brown bakelite? Any issues? I have one here that has been painted by a previous owner.

Thanks
Ben


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 10:25:34 AM on 13 December 2015.
Met's Gravatar
 Met
 Location: NSW
 Member since 3 October 2009
 Member #: 554
 Postcount: 80

I have used stripper on bakelite with success.............


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 1:15:36 PM on 13 December 2015.
Brad's avatar
 Administrator
 Location: Greenwich, NSW
 Member since 15 November 2005
 Member #: 1
 Postcount: 5510

Selleys Kwikstrip is good and not too many fumes, unless you put your snout near the tin. Bakelite will generally cop it well. You may need two or three goes at it, depending on how many coats of paint have been applied.


‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾‾
A valve a day keeps the transistor away...

 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 1:37:44 PM on 13 December 2015.
Redxm's avatar
 Location: Tamworth, NSW
 Member since 6 April 2012
 Member #: 1126
 Postcount: 435

Thanks guys
Good to know.

Ben


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 2:36:59 PM on 23 June 2017.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 1405

Ok I have a Question. I have acquired a AWA 540MA and it has a tiny bit of white house paint on the cloth surrounding the dial. What should I use to remove it. There isn't much and a bit is on the White Bakelite as well.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 2:57:27 PM on 23 June 2017.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

Oil base or water base?
I would be trying prepsol on the bakerlite and picking at it.
As for the cloth .hmm oil or water base paint is the question?
If it is oil dampen in with water and wool wash and pick it off.
If its water base dont wet it as its going to spead


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 5:50:34 PM on 23 June 2017.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 1405

I am sure that its oil based.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 6:06:11 PM on 23 June 2017.
STC830's Gravatar
 Location: NSW
 Member since 10 June 2010
 Member #: 681
 Postcount: 813

In another life I used to mount metal specimens in bakelite for polishing, etching and microscopic examination. The chemicals were a variety of acids (HNO3, HCl, H2SO4), alkalis (NaOH) and solvents eg ethyl alcohol, acetone, carbon tetrachloride. Bakelite is resistant to short term exposure to just about anything.
The only chemicals that I saw cause damage were acetone and chromic acid, but that was after long term exposure, ie overnight. So I reckon short exposure to paint stripper shouldn't cause any damage.

The bakelite used was a variety of colours and all used wood powder as a filler - the cellular structure was visible in the microscope. Out of the mounting molds the mounts have a high polish as the surface is thermo-setting resin with the filler below the surface. In the polished condition a slight texture was always visible as the bakelised wood powder was brought to the surface. So for the best sheen, polishing, especially the use of silicon carbide papers, should be minimised.

It is possible that a different filler was used for radio cabinet moldings, in which case more polishing might be possible. But considering that wood powder is probably the cheapest filler, I would be surprised if something else was used.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 7:01:49 PM on 23 June 2017.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

Oil base on Bakelite will not be a problem to get off, because the bakelite is a smooth surface and the paint, even though its oil base has nothing to bond too. Oil paint is basically varnish with colour pigments in it.

I also agree that a mild stripper like KGB would not hurt that bakelite if it was only on there for a couple of minutes. As for cloth, I can only think that woolwash and picking at the paint maybe the way to go. I have found that prepsol will remove unwanted overspray on car paint work safely, but you cant put it on grill cloth
Pete


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 10:25:06 AM on 26 June 2017.
Ian Robertson's Gravatar
 Location: Belrose, NSW
 Member since 31 December 2015
 Member #: 1844
 Postcount: 1291

I have used automotive clearcoat on very badly weathered bakelite (I'm talking about years of sun and rain) with amazing results.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 12:46:16 PM on 26 June 2017.
Vintage Pete's avatar
 Location: Cromer, NSW
 Member since 1 May 2016
 Member #: 1919
 Postcount: 1050

That would of been Acrylic Auto clear top coat.
It was good stuff and was dust dry in minutes of hitting the panel.
Just pollish it up once a year and looks great.
I spayed hundreds of cars in it,But the industry doesn't use it anymore. only back yard guys ,but you can still buy it at Auto one or any Auto paint supplies and its safe as houses to use, not like 2 pac

Pete


 
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