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Cabinet Repairs

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 Turned leg joint
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 7:24:40 PM on 27 January 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Hi Guys,
I'm working on filling cracks and building up the worn areas
of these legs again.

This photo is taken with the radio sitting upside down with it's legs in the air:
Image Link

This leg is different, and does seem to be higher than the others.
Is the peg inside the leg a part of the turned leg or the radio body?

I've tried gently pushing it, but it doesn't seem to move.
I'm also worry that pulling on it will break the peg part.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 11:05:43 PM on 28 January 2014.
Maven's avatar
 Location: Canberra, ACT
 Member since 23 August 2012
 Member #: 1208
 Postcount: 584

Normally the peg (called a dowel) would be a separate piece, and both sides of the joint would have matching holes.

It may be there as the result of an earlier repair, or it may be original.

If you are worried about splitting the main pieces by twisting too hard, then the safest way is to saw through the pin, then rasp both ends down flat and drill them out, beginning with a drill bit well shy of the dowel diameter. Once the centre is hollowed out, you can often pry the sides of the hollowed dowel loose with fine screwdrivers, chisels, or cheap wood-carving tools often sold as sets in hardware or craft shops.

The worst case is when the glue is too firmly bonded to the outside of the hole. Then gradually reaming it out with larger drill bits and cleaning up with a small round file is all you can do, before replacing the dowel using acrylic wood glue (easier to remove later, if needed).

Maven


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 4:04:32 PM on 29 January 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Thanks for the info.
Do you think a manufacturer could do this to take up slack?
It's only a 4mm gap, but looks huge when you look at it.

I will finish all of the legs first perhaps,
and see if it fits level when all legs are the same lengths.
two legs on one side were a bit worn/rotted right at the end of the leg.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 6:29:42 PM on 29 January 2014.
Maven's avatar
 Location: Canberra, ACT
 Member since 23 August 2012
 Member #: 1208
 Postcount: 584

Chances are that if the leg has moved that much, then the glue on one or both ends of the dowel has already broken its bond. What I would do is:

1. Tap the leg lightly with a wooden mallet or some padded hammer in the lengthwise direction of the dowel. If the gap closes up, then pry it apart again with a broad chisel, slather some glue in there with a knife blade, then tap it back into position.

2. If it won't repond to the mallet taps, then try using a broad chisel blade, or two such blades on two sides, to lever it further apart until it separates. You may find an obvious place to glue and push it back together.

3. Failing both those, what I suggested in previous post

Maven


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 9:03:11 PM on 29 January 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Ok.. if the gap closes, then all is good!
I was trying to avoid removing the radio chassis again,
as I don't want it in the cabinet for the bashing ;)


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 3:50:25 PM on 8 February 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

It appears this time it's the manufacturer taking up a few mm slack to keep the cabinet sitting square.
Image Link
The gap can't be seen in this angle, but it's the leg further away from the camera.
Maybe I'm just a bit picky.

The two or three legs closest to the camera were a bit rotted,
one so bad that half of that ball part was missing,
so I have used some of that two part resin glue initially,
and then a mixture of water based wood filler and a small amount of PVA.

The good news is that none of this is visible with the cabinet upright.

The studs that are bashed into the ends of the legs were either missing, or only partially present.
It seems all modern ones are either cloth or nylon so that they also protect the surface of the floor.

I had an old veneer cabinet that was unsalvageable because it was so exposed to rain that had the studs.
I burned the bottom part of that cabinet to try retrieving the
metal studs, but it seems they also burned in the fire!
I had them down to pieces of wood I could hold in one hand,
but sifting through the ash, they were gone.
It wasn't that I lost them. Bummer!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 2:41:18 PM on 9 February 2014.
Maven's avatar
 Location: Canberra, ACT
 Member since 23 August 2012
 Member #: 1208
 Postcount: 584

Looks like a pretty good job to me - apart from the unintentional cremation. I wouldn't be wanting to replace metal studs under the feet. If you need additional floor protection or stability, you can put those little protector things that look like miniature dog bowls under the feet.

Maven


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 6:17:30 PM on 9 February 2014.
Art's Gravatar
 Art
 Location: Somewhere, USA
 Member since 22 October 2013
 Member #: 1437
 Postcount: 895

Thanks for the comment Smile
While I think I'm fit to boast about the shape.. pretty good for my first job,
there's no way to match wood grain with filler.. but that's where I'm lucky it's out of sight.

The whole thing will be on carpet, the metal studs were just for authenticity.
They don't really need to be there.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 1:32:38 PM on 10 February 2014.
Maven's avatar
 Location: Canberra, ACT
 Member since 23 August 2012
 Member #: 1208
 Postcount: 584

The only way to match wood grain is to use a small artist's paint brush loaded with wood stain to extend the visible grain lines over the filler, applying as many coats as you think look right before putting the top coat of stain over the whole piece.

Whether to dilute the stain for grain-making can only be discovered by trying on an area that will not be seen. Colours are highly variable.

Maven


 
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