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 Circuit drawing
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 11:51:49 AM on 23 December 2018.
Arty41's Gravatar
 Location: Brisbane, QLD
 Member since 18 September 2010
 Member #: 102
 Postcount: 294

Could anyone recommend a circuit drawing program favouring valve circuits rather than solid state?
Thanks.

Wishing a Very Happy and Peaceful Christmas to all.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 1:59:08 PM on 23 December 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 6012

Eagle seems to be the most popular drawing software. Numerous people have created symbol libraries (.lbr files) for it and Googling around I note quite a few for tubes.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 3:00:42 PM on 23 December 2018.
Arty41's Gravatar
 Location: Brisbane, QLD
 Member since 18 September 2010
 Member #: 102
 Postcount: 294

Thanks, have you used it?


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 3:55:50 PM on 23 December 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 6012

I don't have much call for drawing schematics. I have tried doing it with Eagle, but I prefer pencil and squared paper for the sort of simple stuff that I need to draw.

A mate of mine uses Eagle extensively for creating quite complex multi-layer PCBs. The symbols for most of the parts he uses are available for download on the supplier's site (element14, Digikey, Mouser, etc).

Example: https://www.element14.com/community/community/eagle/eagle_cad_libraries

As with most things these days, there's a dedicated user forum: https://forums.autodesk.com/t5/eagle-forum/bd-p/3500


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 3:06:36 AM on 24 December 2018.
JFB's Gravatar
 JFB
 Location: Milton, NSW
 Member since 27 June 2016
 Member #: 1945
 Postcount: 44

For the simple schematics I draw I have settled on Microsoft Visio. It comes standard with basic electrical symbols and valve stencils are freely available online.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 9:57:13 PM on 31 December 2018.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4342

Albeit that it is so old & is still run on an XP computer. I bought a program called "Autosketch" which is an AutoCAD it is modular & you could get symbol libraries for whatever you were aiming at, like houses, engineering, I chose the electrical one that has switches, valves, relays IC's, valves & a myriad of components, plus you can add more, make more, & change & save what is there.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 9:41:01 AM on 1 January 2019.
Fred Lever's Gravatar
 Location: Toongabbie, NSW
 Member since 19 November 2015
 Member #: 1828
 Postcount: 882

Marc!
Autosketch? I had that on my Amstrad 1512 back in about 1986 or was it 1896!!!

Actually it was a very smart piece of drawing software to transit from a drawing board to a PC environment.
It was perfect for somebody like me who just wanted to draw stuff and print it out in a hurry for protoype work.

Naturally I had to learn CAD and was proficient up to CAD 12 but after that it all got too heavy where you could link in all your production modules with parts list, job cards and network commands to NC machinery (from your PC screen direct to the Lathe!) and I left it to the experts.

Actually there was thing called "CAD-Lite", I still have the handbook and discs somewhere, was that "Autosketch" or were they separate products?
Fred.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 11:20:45 AM on 1 January 2019.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4342

I think that could be the same mob I have the paperwork for mine. However, what is the saviour of this program, is that it can save as *.dxf which means it can be/ was transferred to anew version of Adobe. I did this recently where a 32 point Marine compass that was drawn on it was, transferred to Adobe (expensive full featured version) tweaked up as necessary and Laser etched.

Given the right cutter & material cutter should have no difficulty cutting a PC board. So as you note Computer to CNC and now printer has been around for a while. I have even seen CNC cutting aircraft wing parts.

I had been suggesting this sort of thing on the American Forum (and I think this one) as an option where a "die cast" (pot metal) item has disintegrated. I was pleased to see a guy in America follow this through. Whist he did not do the job himself, that is not relevant: The result is a fully working radio, with a new bearing assembly.

Marc


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 9:17:16 AM on 3 January 2019.
Robert69's avatar
 Location: Western Victoria, VIC
 Member since 14 November 2009
 Member #: 579
 Postcount: 109

I've used 'TinyCAD' many times and it is easy to use - plus has valve symbols, or draw your own.


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Robert

 
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