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 Knob removal tricks? Philips model 111 battery radio
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 Return to top of page · Post #: 1 · Written at 11:15:01 PM on 17 August 2018.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 508

Hello, I have a Philips model 111 battery radio I wish to restore. The dial cord is broken (both of them, the pointer one and tuner one!) So I need to pull the radio apart to re-string it. First step in the manual is "remove the knobs" (Volume and tuning) Only problem is they don't want to budge! If I try levering them with screw drivers I'm afraid they might break and I sure don't want that to happen. What special tricks are there to get stubborn knobs to come off without tears?? If anybody has a successful method, can you please share with me?
Thank you.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 2 · Written at 12:11:51 AM on 18 August 2018.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4347

Unfamiliar with model I know 132L has long shaft (neck) knobs with "C" shaped springs which are easy to remove, but some on various sets have stronger ones & the risk you are thinking of is real. This design of knob has a severe attrition rate.

If it has not got screws? It is imperative that the force is applied evenly, any leverage to only one point on the circumference can break the neck at the top. I have two wedge shaped, forked levers, made of perspex just for them. The problem is that many plastics are decomposing and are going brittle.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 3 · Written at 12:47:48 AM on 18 August 2018.
Robbbert's avatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 18 September 2015
 Member #: 1801
 Postcount: 1381

I've even had the case where the knob was on so tightly that the shaft came out of the control, destroying it.

So, be careful..


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 4 · Written at 12:50:02 AM on 18 August 2018.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 508

It's a bakelite sided tin battery radio

https://www.radiomuseum.org/r/philipsaus_111.html

The knobs are on the side, rather large and recessed. Knobs are bakelite too, no screws apparently, just stuck Sad


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 5 · Written at 2:21:23 PM on 18 August 2018.
Tallar Carl's avatar
 Location: Latham, ACT
 Member since 21 February 2015
 Member #: 1705
 Postcount: 1575

A good soaking with WD40 would be my first step and maybe repeated applications over a few days. Its a 60 year old radio so a few more days wont matter.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 6 · Written at 2:56:40 PM on 18 August 2018.
Old Mick's Gravatar
 Location: Highett, VIC
 Member since 11 November 2015
 Member #: 1822
 Postcount: 17

I've got one of these. Philips Radioplayer Portable Model 111 A.

Looks like a lunchbox...

There is a grub screw in each of the the knobs inside the case.
Open the back and look down between the chassis and the side of the case.
Rotate the knob until the screw is visible. Use a long thin flat bladed screwdriver to undo.

Regards

Mick.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 7 · Written at 3:51:46 PM on 18 August 2018.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 508

Ah thanks Mick! I never would have guessed! You've verily saved my bacon!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 8 · Written at 7:10:46 PM on 18 August 2018.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 508

Good news folks, thank you Mick, I found the grub screws and the knobs just fell off once loosened, not easy to get to but I managed, got the dial strings all done, now I just need to get batteries to put inside the original boxes, which are in good condition. I found that F-cell are easy to get, there's four of them in every 6v lantern battery, soldered together, so 8 of these soldered together at the tops and sides inside of the old box and to the original plug socket and then two lots of 5 series 9v E-cells put in parallel to make up the 2 x 45 volt batteries and this old radio will look and work like original! Cheers. Thanks for your help!


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 9 · Written at 7:43:17 PM on 18 August 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 6013

Good outcome. Better to seek advice than apply force.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 10 · Written at 8:41:46 PM on 18 August 2018.
Marcc's avatar
 Location: Wangaratta, VIC
 Member since 21 February 2009
 Member #: 438
 Postcount: 4347

True: Sometimes swallowing ones pride & asking can save a lot of damage. More satisfying to cook & eat the egg, than wear it.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 11 · Written at 9:08:09 PM on 18 August 2018.
GTC's avatar
 GTC
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 28 January 2011
 Member #: 823
 Postcount: 6013

More satisfying to cook & eat the egg, than wear it.

--- or lay one.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 12 · Written at 10:33:50 PM on 18 August 2018.
Robbbert's avatar
 Location: Sydney, NSW
 Member since 18 September 2015
 Member #: 1801
 Postcount: 1381

That arrangement sounds the same as a small Philips mains radio I have, and the glass dial sits up on top of the radio.

I don't remember the model number or I'd find a picture of it.

It has a knob on each side, and there's a grub screw on the inside. You had to turn the knob so it became visible through a hole in the bottom.


 
 Return to top of page · Post #: 13 · Written at 12:20:28 AM on 19 August 2018.
JamieLee's Gravatar
 Location: Clare, SA
 Member since 27 March 2016
 Member #: 1894
 Postcount: 508

I should have realised, being bakelite and 1948, most had grub screws in that era prior to the 1950's, but yes when I couldn't prise them off easily, I thought I'd seek advice... I'm learning!!! It's what I love about this forum. Great guys with lots of experience who are happy to help. I tip my hat to all of you!


 
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